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Dietary thylakoids reduce visceral fat mass and increase expression of genes involved in intestinal fatty acid oxidation in high-fat fed rats

Stenblom, Eva Lena LU ; Egecioglu, Emil LU ; Montelius, Caroline LU ; Ramachandran, Deepti; Bonn, Britta; Weström, Björn LU ; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Langhans, Wolfgang and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte LU (2016) In American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 311(3). p.618-627
Abstract

Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative realtime PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoidtreated rats (n = 8)... (More)

Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative realtime PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoidtreated rats (n = 8) accumulated 25% less visceral fat than controls. Furthermore, fatty acid translocase (Fat/Cd36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a), and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (Hmgcs2) genes were upregulated in the jejunum of the thylakoid-treated group. In the second experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 10) gained 17.5% less weight compared with controls and their respiratory quotient was lower, 0.86 compared with 0.91. Thylakoid-intake resulted in decreased food intake and did not cause steatorrhea. These results suggest that thylakoids stimulated intestinal fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, resulting in an increased ability of the intestine to handle dietary fat. The increased fatty acid oxidation and the resulting reduction in food intake may contribute to the reduced fat accumulation in thylakoid-treated animals.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Energy expenditure, Fat metabolism, Food intake, Plant extracts, Steatorrhea
in
American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
volume
311
issue
3
pages
618 - 627
publisher
American Physiological Society
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84986592885
ISSN
0363-6119
DOI
10.1152/ajpregu.00212.2016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7511f960-79e4-4e57-865a-b3f7ce2020f4
date added to LUP
2016-10-06 10:56:39
date last changed
2016-11-17 13:04:19
@misc{7511f960-79e4-4e57-865a-b3f7ce2020f4,
  abstract     = {<p>Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative realtime PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoidtreated rats (n = 8) accumulated 25% less visceral fat than controls. Furthermore, fatty acid translocase (Fat/Cd36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a), and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (Hmgcs2) genes were upregulated in the jejunum of the thylakoid-treated group. In the second experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 10) gained 17.5% less weight compared with controls and their respiratory quotient was lower, 0.86 compared with 0.91. Thylakoid-intake resulted in decreased food intake and did not cause steatorrhea. These results suggest that thylakoids stimulated intestinal fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, resulting in an increased ability of the intestine to handle dietary fat. The increased fatty acid oxidation and the resulting reduction in food intake may contribute to the reduced fat accumulation in thylakoid-treated animals.</p>},
  author       = {Stenblom, Eva Lena and Egecioglu, Emil and Montelius, Caroline and Ramachandran, Deepti and Bonn, Britta and Weström, Björn and Mansouri, Abdelhak and Langhans, Wolfgang and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte},
  issn         = {0363-6119},
  keyword      = {Energy expenditure,Fat metabolism,Food intake,Plant extracts,Steatorrhea},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {618--627},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa597048)},
  series       = {American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology},
  title        = {Dietary thylakoids reduce visceral fat mass and increase expression of genes involved in intestinal fatty acid oxidation in high-fat fed rats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00212.2016},
  volume       = {311},
  year         = {2016},
}