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Teachers 'voice use in teaching environment. Aspects on speakers' comfort

Lyberg-åhlander, Viveka LU ; Rydell, Roland LU ; Löfqvist, Anders LU ; Pelegrin-García, David and Brunskog, Jonas LU (2015) In Energy Procedia 78. p.3090-3095
Abstract

Teachers have high occupational voice demands. The voice load of teachers is both environmental and individual. Little is known about the teachers' own view of the contribution from the environment and about the teachers' voice use at their work-place. Aim: The purpose was to investigate the voice use and prevalence of voice problems in teachers and to explore their ratings of vocally loading aspects of their working environment. Method: A questionnaire-survey in 467 teachers aiming to explore the prevalence of voice problems in teaching staff identified teachers with voice problems and vocally healthy colleagues separated in two groups, teachers with self-assessed voice problems and vocally healthy teachers. Teachers with voice... (More)

Teachers have high occupational voice demands. The voice load of teachers is both environmental and individual. Little is known about the teachers' own view of the contribution from the environment and about the teachers' voice use at their work-place. Aim: The purpose was to investigate the voice use and prevalence of voice problems in teachers and to explore their ratings of vocally loading aspects of their working environment. Method: A questionnaire-survey in 467 teachers aiming to explore the prevalence of voice problems in teaching staff identified teachers with voice problems and vocally healthy colleagues separated in two groups, teachers with self-assessed voice problems and vocally healthy teachers. Teachers with voice problems were further, matched to a voice healthy colleague from the same school. The pairs were investigated and compared for clinical findings and for vocal behavior in the teaching environment and aspects of the classroom environment were also measured. Results: Teachers with voice problems were more affected by any loading factor in the work-environment and were more perceptive of the room acoustics. Differences between the groups were found during field-measurements of the voice, while there were no differences in the findings from the clinical examinations of larynx and voice. Conclusion: Teachers suffering from voice problems react stronger to loading factors in the teaching environment. It is in the interplay between the individual and the work environment that voice problems emerge.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Classrooms, Occupational voice, Room acoustics, Speakers' comfort, Subjective assessment, Teachers
in
Energy Procedia
volume
78
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84962507895
ISSN
1876-6102
DOI
10.1016/j.egypro.2015.11.762
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9a8d5495-22c1-41e7-8079-85bec0909c8c
date added to LUP
2016-09-23 07:07:59
date last changed
2016-11-14 13:44:40
@misc{9a8d5495-22c1-41e7-8079-85bec0909c8c,
  abstract     = {<p>Teachers have high occupational voice demands. The voice load of teachers is both environmental and individual. Little is known about the teachers' own view of the contribution from the environment and about the teachers' voice use at their work-place. Aim: The purpose was to investigate the voice use and prevalence of voice problems in teachers and to explore their ratings of vocally loading aspects of their working environment. Method: A questionnaire-survey in 467 teachers aiming to explore the prevalence of voice problems in teaching staff identified teachers with voice problems and vocally healthy colleagues separated in two groups, teachers with self-assessed voice problems and vocally healthy teachers. Teachers with voice problems were further, matched to a voice healthy colleague from the same school. The pairs were investigated and compared for clinical findings and for vocal behavior in the teaching environment and aspects of the classroom environment were also measured. Results: Teachers with voice problems were more affected by any loading factor in the work-environment and were more perceptive of the room acoustics. Differences between the groups were found during field-measurements of the voice, while there were no differences in the findings from the clinical examinations of larynx and voice. Conclusion: Teachers suffering from voice problems react stronger to loading factors in the teaching environment. It is in the interplay between the individual and the work environment that voice problems emerge.</p>},
  author       = {Lyberg-åhlander, Viveka and Rydell, Roland and Löfqvist, Anders and Pelegrin-García, David and Brunskog, Jonas},
  issn         = {1876-6102},
  keyword      = {Classrooms,Occupational voice,Room acoustics,Speakers' comfort,Subjective assessment,Teachers},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {3090--3095},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9f1e278)},
  series       = {Energy Procedia},
  title        = {Teachers 'voice use in teaching environment. Aspects on speakers' comfort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2015.11.762},
  volume       = {78},
  year         = {2015},
}