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Impact of postal and telephone reminders on pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions.

Ekedahl, Anders LU ; Oskarsson, Vivianne; Sundberg, Barbro; Gustafsson, Veronica; Lundberg, Therese and Gullberg, Bo LU (2008) In PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE 30. p.503-508
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the impact of a reminder (i.e., a mailed letter or short telephone call) from the pharmacy to patients, compared with no reminder in a control group, on the pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions. Method: Patients, with e-prescriptions transmitted to four large community pharmacies in two counties in northern Sweden and remaining unclaimed after 4 weekdays, were randomised to one of two intervention groups (a mailed reminder or a short telephonic reminder) or a control group. Main outcome measures: Rates of patients' pick-up of their e-prescriptions at follow-up after about 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Results: Altogether, 320 patients with e-prescriptions, transmitted from March 21 through April 6 and not picked-up or... (More)
Objective: To investigate the impact of a reminder (i.e., a mailed letter or short telephone call) from the pharmacy to patients, compared with no reminder in a control group, on the pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions. Method: Patients, with e-prescriptions transmitted to four large community pharmacies in two counties in northern Sweden and remaining unclaimed after 4 weekdays, were randomised to one of two intervention groups (a mailed reminder or a short telephonic reminder) or a control group. Main outcome measures: Rates of patients' pick-up of their e-prescriptions at follow-up after about 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Results: Altogether, 320 patients with e-prescriptions, transmitted from March 21 through April 6 and not picked-up or dispensed, were identified and randomised to the study. There were no statistically significant differences in overall pick-up rates between the groups or with respect to gender. However, pick-up rates increased with increasing age. Higher pick-up rates were observed for two subgroups (but only in the mailed reminder group compared with controls)-for cardiovascular drugs to men and for respiratory drugs to adolescents and young adults. Conclusion: A reminder (i.e., a mailed letter or short telephone call) from the pharmacy to the patient had no statistically significant effect on overall pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions compared with no reminders. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE
volume
30
pages
503 - 508
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • PMID:18247155
  • WOS:000259443000003
  • Scopus:52549106113
ISSN
0928-1231
DOI
10.1007/s11096-008-9196-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b5e6b805-22a8-46dd-84a7-8f646cf68730 (old id 1042288)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18247155?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-03-04 10:44:35
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:50:20
@article{b5e6b805-22a8-46dd-84a7-8f646cf68730,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate the impact of a reminder (i.e., a mailed letter or short telephone call) from the pharmacy to patients, compared with no reminder in a control group, on the pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions. Method: Patients, with e-prescriptions transmitted to four large community pharmacies in two counties in northern Sweden and remaining unclaimed after 4 weekdays, were randomised to one of two intervention groups (a mailed reminder or a short telephonic reminder) or a control group. Main outcome measures: Rates of patients' pick-up of their e-prescriptions at follow-up after about 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Results: Altogether, 320 patients with e-prescriptions, transmitted from March 21 through April 6 and not picked-up or dispensed, were identified and randomised to the study. There were no statistically significant differences in overall pick-up rates between the groups or with respect to gender. However, pick-up rates increased with increasing age. Higher pick-up rates were observed for two subgroups (but only in the mailed reminder group compared with controls)-for cardiovascular drugs to men and for respiratory drugs to adolescents and young adults. Conclusion: A reminder (i.e., a mailed letter or short telephone call) from the pharmacy to the patient had no statistically significant effect on overall pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions compared with no reminders.},
  author       = {Ekedahl, Anders and Oskarsson, Vivianne and Sundberg, Barbro and Gustafsson, Veronica and Lundberg, Therese and Gullberg, Bo},
  issn         = {0928-1231},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {503--508},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE},
  title        = {Impact of postal and telephone reminders on pick-up rates of unclaimed e-prescriptions.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11096-008-9196-5},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2008},
}