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Islet function phenotype in gastrin-releasing Peptide receptor gene-deficient mice.

Persson, Kristin; Pacini, Giovanni; Sundler, Frank LU and Ahrén, Bo LU (2002) In Endocrinology 143(10). p.3717-3726
Abstract
Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is an islet neuropeptide that stimulates insulin secretion. To explore whether islet GRP contributes to neurally mediated insulin secretion, we studied GRP receptor (GRPR)-deleted mice. By using RT-PCR we showed that GRPR mRNA is expressed in islets of wild-type mice, but is lost in GRPR-deleted mice. Functional studies revealed that GRP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in wild-type animals, but not in GRPR-deleted mice. This shows that GRPR is the receptor subtype mediating GRP-induced insulin secretion and that GRPR-deleted mice are tools for studying the physiological role of islet GRP. We found that GRPR-deleted mice display 1) augmentation of the insulin response to glucose by a... (More)
Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is an islet neuropeptide that stimulates insulin secretion. To explore whether islet GRP contributes to neurally mediated insulin secretion, we studied GRP receptor (GRPR)-deleted mice. By using RT-PCR we showed that GRPR mRNA is expressed in islets of wild-type mice, but is lost in GRPR-deleted mice. Functional studies revealed that GRP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in wild-type animals, but not in GRPR-deleted mice. This shows that GRPR is the receptor subtype mediating GRP-induced insulin secretion and that GRPR-deleted mice are tools for studying the physiological role of islet GRP. We found that GRPR-deleted mice display 1) augmentation of the insulin response to glucose by a mechanism inhibited by ganglionic blockade; 2) increased insulin responsiveness also to the cholinergic agonist carbachol, but not to arginine; 3) impaired insulin and glucagon responses to autonomic nerve activation by 2-deoxyglucose; 4) normal islet adaptation to high fat-induced insulin resistance and fasting; and 5) normal islet cytoarchitecture, as revealed by immunocytochemistry of insulin and glucagon. In conclusion, 1) GRPR is the receptor subtype mediating the islet effects of GRP; 2) GRP contributes to insulin secretion induced by activation of the autonomic nerves; and 3) deletion of GRPR is compensated by increased cholinergic sensitivity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Endocrinology
volume
143
issue
10
pages
3717 - 3726
publisher
Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:12239081
  • wos:000178212800003
  • scopus:0036773332
ISSN
0013-7227
DOI
10.1210/en.2002-220371
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
05650dff-a93e-47e1-aa0d-925c39891ca0 (old id 110263)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12239081&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-05 09:43:22
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:37:04
@article{05650dff-a93e-47e1-aa0d-925c39891ca0,
  abstract     = {Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is an islet neuropeptide that stimulates insulin secretion. To explore whether islet GRP contributes to neurally mediated insulin secretion, we studied GRP receptor (GRPR)-deleted mice. By using RT-PCR we showed that GRPR mRNA is expressed in islets of wild-type mice, but is lost in GRPR-deleted mice. Functional studies revealed that GRP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in wild-type animals, but not in GRPR-deleted mice. This shows that GRPR is the receptor subtype mediating GRP-induced insulin secretion and that GRPR-deleted mice are tools for studying the physiological role of islet GRP. We found that GRPR-deleted mice display 1) augmentation of the insulin response to glucose by a mechanism inhibited by ganglionic blockade; 2) increased insulin responsiveness also to the cholinergic agonist carbachol, but not to arginine; 3) impaired insulin and glucagon responses to autonomic nerve activation by 2-deoxyglucose; 4) normal islet adaptation to high fat-induced insulin resistance and fasting; and 5) normal islet cytoarchitecture, as revealed by immunocytochemistry of insulin and glucagon. In conclusion, 1) GRPR is the receptor subtype mediating the islet effects of GRP; 2) GRP contributes to insulin secretion induced by activation of the autonomic nerves; and 3) deletion of GRPR is compensated by increased cholinergic sensitivity.},
  author       = {Persson, Kristin and Pacini, Giovanni and Sundler, Frank and Ahrén, Bo},
  issn         = {0013-7227},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {3717--3726},
  publisher    = {Endocrine Society},
  series       = {Endocrinology},
  title        = {Islet function phenotype in gastrin-releasing Peptide receptor gene-deficient mice.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2002-220371},
  volume       = {143},
  year         = {2002},
}