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A comparative study on the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of boronated porphyrin (BOPP) and sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) in the RG2 rat glioma model

Ceberg, Crister LU ; Brun, Arne LU ; Kahl, Stephen B; Koo, Myoung Seo; Persson, Bertil R LU and Salford, Leif LU (1995) In Journal of Neurosurgery 83(1). p.86-92
Abstract
Boron neutron capture therapy is a treatment modality for cancer that depends on the specific uptake of boron by the tumor cells. The infiltrative growth of malignant gliomas requires that boron reach and accumulate in migrating cells outside the margin of the tumor; thus, it is important that the biodistribution of new boron compounds is also studied in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This study is undertaken in the present work, in which the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) and boronated porphyrin (BOPP) in the RG2 rat glioma model are investigated. This model mimics the characteristics of human glioma with cells migrating into the surrounding brain. The animals were infused intravenously with... (More)
Boron neutron capture therapy is a treatment modality for cancer that depends on the specific uptake of boron by the tumor cells. The infiltrative growth of malignant gliomas requires that boron reach and accumulate in migrating cells outside the margin of the tumor; thus, it is important that the biodistribution of new boron compounds is also studied in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This study is undertaken in the present work, in which the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) and boronated porphyrin (BOPP) in the RG2 rat glioma model are investigated. This model mimics the characteristics of human glioma with cells migrating into the surrounding brain. The animals were infused intravenously with either BSH (25 micrograms or 175 micrograms of boron per gram of body weight) or BOPP (12 micrograms of boron per gram body weight). For the low dose of BSH, the maximum tumor-boron content was 8 ppm at approximately 9 hours after the infusion with a tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.6. At the higher dose, the corresponding figures were 15 ppm after 12 hours with a tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.5. For BOPP, a tumor-boron concentration of 81 ppm was achieved 24 hours after the infusion and sustained in that range for at least 72 hours. The tumor-to-blood ratio at 24 hours was slightly above 6, but continued to increase as the blood was cleared. These results indicate that both compounds are spread into the normal brain tissue following the same pathways as the migrating tumor cells and in this way can be taken up even in distant tumor cell foci. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biodistribution, boronated porphyrin, sulfhydryl boron hydride, rat glioma, boron neutron capture therapy
in
Journal of Neurosurgery
volume
83
issue
1
pages
86 - 92
publisher
American Association of Neurosurgeons
external identifiers
  • pmid:7782856
  • scopus:0029037102
ISSN
0022-3085
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0525a5e8-9a0c-42bc-a067-0659deae1e7a (old id 1109457)
alternative location
http://jnsonline.org/jns/issues/v83n1/pdf/n0830086.pdf
date added to LUP
2008-07-28 15:23:52
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:34:04
@article{0525a5e8-9a0c-42bc-a067-0659deae1e7a,
  abstract     = {Boron neutron capture therapy is a treatment modality for cancer that depends on the specific uptake of boron by the tumor cells. The infiltrative growth of malignant gliomas requires that boron reach and accumulate in migrating cells outside the margin of the tumor; thus, it is important that the biodistribution of new boron compounds is also studied in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This study is undertaken in the present work, in which the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) and boronated porphyrin (BOPP) in the RG2 rat glioma model are investigated. This model mimics the characteristics of human glioma with cells migrating into the surrounding brain. The animals were infused intravenously with either BSH (25 micrograms or 175 micrograms of boron per gram of body weight) or BOPP (12 micrograms of boron per gram body weight). For the low dose of BSH, the maximum tumor-boron content was 8 ppm at approximately 9 hours after the infusion with a tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.6. At the higher dose, the corresponding figures were 15 ppm after 12 hours with a tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.5. For BOPP, a tumor-boron concentration of 81 ppm was achieved 24 hours after the infusion and sustained in that range for at least 72 hours. The tumor-to-blood ratio at 24 hours was slightly above 6, but continued to increase as the blood was cleared. These results indicate that both compounds are spread into the normal brain tissue following the same pathways as the migrating tumor cells and in this way can be taken up even in distant tumor cell foci.},
  author       = {Ceberg, Crister and Brun, Arne and Kahl, Stephen B and Koo, Myoung Seo and Persson, Bertil R and Salford, Leif},
  issn         = {0022-3085},
  keyword      = {biodistribution,boronated porphyrin,sulfhydryl boron hydride,rat glioma,boron neutron capture therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {86--92},
  publisher    = {American Association of Neurosurgeons},
  series       = {Journal of Neurosurgery},
  title        = {A comparative study on the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of boronated porphyrin (BOPP) and sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) in the RG2 rat glioma model},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {1995},
}