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Quantification of low-velocity motion using a navigator-echo supported MR velocity-mapping technique: application to intracranial dynamics in volunteers and patients with brain tumours

Wirestam, Ronnie LU ; Salford, Leif LU ; Thomsen, C; Brockstedt, Sara LU ; Persson, B R and Ståhlberg, Freddy LU (1997) In Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15(1). p.1-11
Abstract
Gradient-echo pulse sequences with velocity-encoding gradients of 22.5-25 mT/m, were used for brain-motion and CSF-flow studies. To reduce motion artifacts, a phase-correction technique based on navigator echoes was evaluated. Three patients with right-sided parietal tumours were investigated; one astrocytoma grade III-IV, one astrocytoma grade I-II and one benign meningioma. In healthy volunteers, a maximal brain-tissue velocity of (0.94 +/- 0.26) mm/s (mean +/- 1SD) was observed, which is consistent with previously presented results. The phase correction was proven useful for reduction of artifacts due to external head movements in modulus and phase images, without loss of phase information related to internal motion. The tissue velocity... (More)
Gradient-echo pulse sequences with velocity-encoding gradients of 22.5-25 mT/m, were used for brain-motion and CSF-flow studies. To reduce motion artifacts, a phase-correction technique based on navigator echoes was evaluated. Three patients with right-sided parietal tumours were investigated; one astrocytoma grade III-IV, one astrocytoma grade I-II and one benign meningioma. In healthy volunteers, a maximal brain-tissue velocity of (0.94 +/- 0.26) mm/s (mean +/- 1SD) was observed, which is consistent with previously presented results. The phase correction was proven useful for reduction of artifacts due to external head movements in modulus and phase images, without loss of phase information related to internal motion. The tissue velocity within the astrocytomas was low during the entire cardiac cycle. An abnormally high rostral velocity component was, however, observed in the brain tissue frontal to the astrocytomas. In all patients, an abnormal CSF flow pattern was observed. The study of brain motion may provide further understanding of the effects of tumours and other pathological conditions in the brain. When considering intracranial motion as a source of error in diffusion/perfusion MRI, the present study suggests that a pathology can alter the properties of brain motion and CSF flow considerably, leading to a more complex impact on diffusion/perfusion images. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Brain tumour, Brain motion, Cerebrospinal fluid, Magnetic resonance imaging, Velocity mapping, Phase mapping
in
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
volume
15
issue
1
pages
1 - 11
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:9084019
  • scopus:0030895325
ISSN
1873-5894
DOI
10.1016/S0730-725X(96)00341-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7a117166-94a8-48f3-9c44-e57d3be66bb7 (old id 1111225)
date added to LUP
2008-07-17 09:49:17
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:54:21
@article{7a117166-94a8-48f3-9c44-e57d3be66bb7,
  abstract     = {Gradient-echo pulse sequences with velocity-encoding gradients of 22.5-25 mT/m, were used for brain-motion and CSF-flow studies. To reduce motion artifacts, a phase-correction technique based on navigator echoes was evaluated. Three patients with right-sided parietal tumours were investigated; one astrocytoma grade III-IV, one astrocytoma grade I-II and one benign meningioma. In healthy volunteers, a maximal brain-tissue velocity of (0.94 +/- 0.26) mm/s (mean +/- 1SD) was observed, which is consistent with previously presented results. The phase correction was proven useful for reduction of artifacts due to external head movements in modulus and phase images, without loss of phase information related to internal motion. The tissue velocity within the astrocytomas was low during the entire cardiac cycle. An abnormally high rostral velocity component was, however, observed in the brain tissue frontal to the astrocytomas. In all patients, an abnormal CSF flow pattern was observed. The study of brain motion may provide further understanding of the effects of tumours and other pathological conditions in the brain. When considering intracranial motion as a source of error in diffusion/perfusion MRI, the present study suggests that a pathology can alter the properties of brain motion and CSF flow considerably, leading to a more complex impact on diffusion/perfusion images.},
  author       = {Wirestam, Ronnie and Salford, Leif and Thomsen, C and Brockstedt, Sara and Persson, B R and Ståhlberg, Freddy},
  issn         = {1873-5894},
  keyword      = {Brain tumour,Brain motion,Cerebrospinal fluid,Magnetic resonance imaging,Velocity mapping,Phase mapping},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--11},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  title        = {Quantification of low-velocity motion using a navigator-echo supported MR velocity-mapping technique: application to intracranial dynamics in volunteers and patients with brain tumours},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0730-725X(96)00341-4},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {1997},
}