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dGEMRIC (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage) indicates adaptive capacity of human knee cartilage.

Tiderius, Carl Johan LU ; Svensson, Jonas LU ; Leander, Peter LU ; Thorsson, Ola LU and Dahlberg, Leif LU (2004) In Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 51(2). p.286-290
Abstract
Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a new imaging technique to estimate joint cartilage glycosaminoglycan content by T1-relaxation time measurements after penetration of the hydrophilic contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. This study compares dGEMRIC in age-matched healthy volunteers with different levels of physical activity: Group 1 (n = 12): nonexercising individuals; Group 2 (n = 16): individuals with physical exercise averaging twice weekly; Group 3 (n = 9): male elite runners. dGEMRIC was performed 2 hr after an intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA2- at 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. T1 differed significantly between the three different levels of physical exercise. T1 values (mean of medial and lateral femoral cartilage) for Groups... (More)
Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a new imaging technique to estimate joint cartilage glycosaminoglycan content by T1-relaxation time measurements after penetration of the hydrophilic contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. This study compares dGEMRIC in age-matched healthy volunteers with different levels of physical activity: Group 1 (n = 12): nonexercising individuals; Group 2 (n = 16): individuals with physical exercise averaging twice weekly; Group 3 (n = 9): male elite runners. dGEMRIC was performed 2 hr after an intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA2- at 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. T1 differed significantly between the three different levels of physical exercise. T1 values (mean of medial and lateral femoral cartilage) for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were: 382 ± 33, 424 ± 22 and 476 ± 36, respectively (ms, mean ± SD) (P = 0.0004, 1 vs. 2 and 0.0002, 2 vs. 3). Irrespective of the exercise level, T1 was longer in lateral compared to medial femoral cartilage (P = 0.00005; n = 37). In conclusion, this cross-sectional study indicates that human knee cartilage adapts to exercise by increasing the glycosaminoglycan content. Furthermore, results suggest a compartmental difference within the knee with a higher glycosaminoglycan content in lateral compared to medial femoral cartilage. A higher proportion of extracellular water, i.e., larger distribution volume, may to some extent explain the high T1 in the elite runners. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cartilage, biomechanics, MRI, knee
in
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
volume
51
issue
2
pages
286 - 290
publisher
Wiley Online Library
external identifiers
  • pmid:14755653
  • wos:000188718600010
  • scopus:0842307388
ISSN
1522-2594
DOI
10.1002/mrm.10714
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df7f191c-fa13-4165-91d1-9d88f29e9578 (old id 120787)
date added to LUP
2007-07-30 11:42:39
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:38:41
@article{df7f191c-fa13-4165-91d1-9d88f29e9578,
  abstract     = {Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a new imaging technique to estimate joint cartilage glycosaminoglycan content by T1-relaxation time measurements after penetration of the hydrophilic contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. This study compares dGEMRIC in age-matched healthy volunteers with different levels of physical activity: Group 1 (n = 12): nonexercising individuals; Group 2 (n = 16): individuals with physical exercise averaging twice weekly; Group 3 (n = 9): male elite runners. dGEMRIC was performed 2 hr after an intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA2- at 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. T1 differed significantly between the three different levels of physical exercise. T1 values (mean of medial and lateral femoral cartilage) for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were: 382 ± 33, 424 ± 22 and 476 ± 36, respectively (ms, mean ± SD) (P = 0.0004, 1 vs. 2 and 0.0002, 2 vs. 3). Irrespective of the exercise level, T1 was longer in lateral compared to medial femoral cartilage (P = 0.00005; n = 37). In conclusion, this cross-sectional study indicates that human knee cartilage adapts to exercise by increasing the glycosaminoglycan content. Furthermore, results suggest a compartmental difference within the knee with a higher glycosaminoglycan content in lateral compared to medial femoral cartilage. A higher proportion of extracellular water, i.e., larger distribution volume, may to some extent explain the high T1 in the elite runners.},
  author       = {Tiderius, Carl Johan and Svensson, Jonas and Leander, Peter and Thorsson, Ola and Dahlberg, Leif},
  issn         = {1522-2594},
  keyword      = {cartilage,biomechanics,MRI,knee},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {286--290},
  publisher    = {Wiley Online Library},
  series       = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
  title        = {dGEMRIC (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage) indicates adaptive capacity of human knee cartilage.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.10714},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2004},
}