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Bisphenol A concentration in human saliva related to dental polymer-based fillings

Berge, T. L L; Lygre, G. B.; Jönsson, Bo A LU ; Lindh, C. H. LU and Björkman, L. (2017) In Clinical Oral Investigations 21(8). p.2561-2568
Abstract

Objectives: The aims of this study were to quantify salivary concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and to assess if presence of dental composite fillings is associated with higher BPA levels in saliva. Materials and methods: Twenty individuals with six or more tooth surfaces filled with polymer-based dental materials (composite group) and 20 individuals without any polymer-based materials (control group) were included in the study. Saliva was collected in polypropylene tubes and stored at −80 °C before analysis. Concentration of free (unconjugated) and total bisphenol A was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Values below limit of detection (0.1 ng/mL) were set to one-half of the limit of detection. Mann-Whitney... (More)

Objectives: The aims of this study were to quantify salivary concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and to assess if presence of dental composite fillings is associated with higher BPA levels in saliva. Materials and methods: Twenty individuals with six or more tooth surfaces filled with polymer-based dental materials (composite group) and 20 individuals without any polymer-based materials (control group) were included in the study. Saliva was collected in polypropylene tubes and stored at −80 °C before analysis. Concentration of free (unconjugated) and total bisphenol A was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Values below limit of detection (0.1 ng/mL) were set to one-half of the limit of detection. Mann-Whitney U test (one sided; the Exact Tests Option in IBM-SPSS version 21) was used for the statistical analyses. Results: The concentration of BPA in saliva was very low. In the composite group, 8 of 20 samples had detectable concentrations of BPA. In the control group, 3 of 20 samples had detectable concentrations of BPA. Statistical analysis indicated that the concentration of unconjugated BPA was slightly higher in the composite group (p = 0.044) than in the control group. Conclusions: Presence of dental composites may be associated with slightly higher concentration of unconjugated BPA in saliva. However, additional studies using sensitive analytical methods are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Influence from other factors, like food intake and time of the day for saliva sampling, must be considered. Clinical relevance: The relative contribution of existing polymer-based dental fillings to total BPA exposure seems to be low.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bisphenol A, Composite resins, Dental polymer-based fillings, Human saliva
in
Clinical Oral Investigations
volume
21
issue
8
pages
2561 - 2568
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85011844834
  • wos:000412450900019
ISSN
1432-6981
DOI
10.1007/s00784-017-2055-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12fb0db2-aa43-421d-9b24-6eee30143a6b
date added to LUP
2017-02-23 07:19:19
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:24:05
@article{12fb0db2-aa43-421d-9b24-6eee30143a6b,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: The aims of this study were to quantify salivary concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and to assess if presence of dental composite fillings is associated with higher BPA levels in saliva. Materials and methods: Twenty individuals with six or more tooth surfaces filled with polymer-based dental materials (composite group) and 20 individuals without any polymer-based materials (control group) were included in the study. Saliva was collected in polypropylene tubes and stored at −80 °C before analysis. Concentration of free (unconjugated) and total bisphenol A was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Values below limit of detection (0.1 ng/mL) were set to one-half of the limit of detection. Mann-Whitney U test (one sided; the Exact Tests Option in IBM-SPSS version 21) was used for the statistical analyses. Results: The concentration of BPA in saliva was very low. In the composite group, 8 of 20 samples had detectable concentrations of BPA. In the control group, 3 of 20 samples had detectable concentrations of BPA. Statistical analysis indicated that the concentration of unconjugated BPA was slightly higher in the composite group (p = 0.044) than in the control group. Conclusions: Presence of dental composites may be associated with slightly higher concentration of unconjugated BPA in saliva. However, additional studies using sensitive analytical methods are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Influence from other factors, like food intake and time of the day for saliva sampling, must be considered. Clinical relevance: The relative contribution of existing polymer-based dental fillings to total BPA exposure seems to be low.</p>},
  author       = {Berge, T. L L and Lygre, G. B. and Jönsson, Bo A and Lindh, C. H. and Björkman, L.},
  issn         = {1432-6981},
  keyword      = {Bisphenol A,Composite resins,Dental polymer-based fillings,Human saliva},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {2561--2568},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Clinical Oral Investigations},
  title        = {Bisphenol A concentration in human saliva related to dental polymer-based fillings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2055-9},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2017},
}