Advanced

An ethnographic observation study of the facilitator role in an implementation process

Tiberg, Irén LU ; Hansson, Kristofer LU ; Holmberg, Robert LU and Hallström, Inger LU (2017) In BMC Research Notes 10.
Abstract

Background

Even though the importance of a facilitator during an implementation process is well described, the facilitator’s role is rarely problematized in relation to the organizational context in terms of power and legitimacy; themes which have recently been brought to the fore when studying change in health care organizations. Therefore, in this article, we present a qualitative study with the aim of identifying key aspects of the experience of being in a facilitator role. The data collection involved ethnographic fieldwork encompassing observations and field notes, as well as two qualitative interviews with the facilitator. The data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method in order to formulate... (More)

Background

Even though the importance of a facilitator during an implementation process is well described, the facilitator’s role is rarely problematized in relation to the organizational context in terms of power and legitimacy; themes which have recently been brought to the fore when studying change in health care organizations. Therefore, in this article, we present a qualitative study with the aim of identifying key aspects of the experience of being in a facilitator role. The data collection involved ethnographic fieldwork encompassing observations and field notes, as well as two qualitative interviews with the facilitator. The data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method in order to formulate thematic aspects of the implementation process. The study was conducted in southern Sweden between January 2013 and August 2014.
Results

One main theme, “walking a tightrope”, and four sub-themes, all of which involved balancing acts of different levels and different ways, were identified. These included: being in control, but needing to adjust; pushing for change, but forced to stand back; being accepted, but dependent; and being reasonable, but culturally sensitive.
Conclusion

Instead of listing the desirable qualities and conditions of a facilitator, this study shows that being a facilitator can be described more completely by applying the concept of role, thus allowing a more holistic process of reflection and analysis. This in turn makes it possible to move from the reactive stance of balancing to a more proactive stance of negotiating.
(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Research Notes
volume
10
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85035784476
ISSN
1756-0500
DOI
10.1186/s13104-017-2962-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
135e4c2d-668f-4fd8-832d-8834f8e9a6bb
date added to LUP
2017-12-04 13:13:30
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:27:14
@article{135e4c2d-668f-4fd8-832d-8834f8e9a6bb,
  abstract     = {<br/>Background<br/><br/>Even though the importance of a facilitator during an implementation process is well described, the facilitator’s role is rarely problematized in relation to the organizational context in terms of power and legitimacy; themes which have recently been brought to the fore when studying change in health care organizations. Therefore, in this article, we present a qualitative study with the aim of identifying key aspects of the experience of being in a facilitator role. The data collection involved ethnographic fieldwork encompassing observations and field notes, as well as two qualitative interviews with the facilitator. The data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method in order to formulate thematic aspects of the implementation process. The study was conducted in southern Sweden between January 2013 and August 2014.<br/>Results<br/><br/>One main theme, “walking a tightrope”, and four sub-themes, all of which involved balancing acts of different levels and different ways, were identified. These included: being in control, but needing to adjust; pushing for change, but forced to stand back; being accepted, but dependent; and being reasonable, but culturally sensitive.<br/>Conclusion<br/><br/>Instead of listing the desirable qualities and conditions of a facilitator, this study shows that being a facilitator can be described more completely by applying the concept of role, thus allowing a more holistic process of reflection and analysis. This in turn makes it possible to move from the reactive stance of balancing to a more proactive stance of negotiating.<br/>},
  articleno    = {10:630},
  author       = {Tiberg, Irén and Hansson, Kristofer and Holmberg, Robert and Hallström, Inger},
  issn         = {1756-0500},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Research Notes},
  title        = {An ethnographic observation study of the facilitator role in an implementation process},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-2962-5},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2017},
}