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Osmotic-treatment-induced cell death and osmotic processing kinetics of apples with characterised raw material properties

Mavroudis, Nikolaos LU ; Dejmek, Petr LU and Sjöholm, Ingegerd LU (2004) In Journal of Food Engineering 63(1). p.47-56
Abstract
Three apple varieties cultivated in southern Sweden namely Jonagold, Kim and Mutsu were subjected to osmotic treatment at 5, 20 and 40 degreesC with a 50% sucrose solution. The evaluation of cell viability after osmotic processing, was carried out in Granny Smith apples from Argentina. The processing conditions were 50% sucrose solution at 20 degreesC and the viability assay used was based on the reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). The experimental samples were separated into inner (close to the apple core) and outer (close to the skin) specimens, due to the existence of pronounced structural differences between them. The kinetics revealed that for each apple variety and at each process temperature, samples of the outer... (More)
Three apple varieties cultivated in southern Sweden namely Jonagold, Kim and Mutsu were subjected to osmotic treatment at 5, 20 and 40 degreesC with a 50% sucrose solution. The evaluation of cell viability after osmotic processing, was carried out in Granny Smith apples from Argentina. The processing conditions were 50% sucrose solution at 20 degreesC and the viability assay used was based on the reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). The experimental samples were separated into inner (close to the apple core) and outer (close to the skin) specimens, due to the existence of pronounced structural differences between them. The kinetics revealed that for each apple variety and at each process temperature, samples of the outer structure exhibited higher water loss and lower solids gain than those of the inner structure. Overall, the Jonagold and Kim apples exhibited similarly high water loss, while Mutsu showed a lower loss. Jonagold absorbed the lowest amount of solids with Kim rating second and Mutsu apples showing the highest solids gain. The cell viability assay on the experimental samples revealed the first layer of cell in a depth 1-2 mm from the surface to die as a result of the severe osmotic shock. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Mass transfer, Cell viability, Apple, Tissue structure, Osmotic dehydration
in
Journal of Food Engineering
volume
63
issue
1
pages
47 - 56
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000188954200007
  • scopus:0347592208
ISSN
0260-8774
DOI
10.1016/S0260-8774(03)00281-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6f9f62f5-6ca3-417b-8e53-270a0e1fc245 (old id 139261)
date added to LUP
2007-07-19 08:34:58
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:30:35
@article{6f9f62f5-6ca3-417b-8e53-270a0e1fc245,
  abstract     = {Three apple varieties cultivated in southern Sweden namely Jonagold, Kim and Mutsu were subjected to osmotic treatment at 5, 20 and 40 degreesC with a 50% sucrose solution. The evaluation of cell viability after osmotic processing, was carried out in Granny Smith apples from Argentina. The processing conditions were 50% sucrose solution at 20 degreesC and the viability assay used was based on the reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). The experimental samples were separated into inner (close to the apple core) and outer (close to the skin) specimens, due to the existence of pronounced structural differences between them. The kinetics revealed that for each apple variety and at each process temperature, samples of the outer structure exhibited higher water loss and lower solids gain than those of the inner structure. Overall, the Jonagold and Kim apples exhibited similarly high water loss, while Mutsu showed a lower loss. Jonagold absorbed the lowest amount of solids with Kim rating second and Mutsu apples showing the highest solids gain. The cell viability assay on the experimental samples revealed the first layer of cell in a depth 1-2 mm from the surface to die as a result of the severe osmotic shock. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Mavroudis, Nikolaos and Dejmek, Petr and Sjöholm, Ingegerd},
  issn         = {0260-8774},
  keyword      = {Mass transfer,Cell viability,Apple,Tissue structure,Osmotic dehydration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {47--56},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Food Engineering},
  title        = {Osmotic-treatment-induced cell death and osmotic processing kinetics of apples with characterised raw material properties},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0260-8774(03)00281-4},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2004},
}