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Neuron specific enolase and S-100B as predictors of outcome after cardiac arrest and induced hypothermia.

Rundgren, Malin LU ; Karlsson, Torbjörn LU ; Nielsen, Niklas LU ; Cronberg, Tobias LU ; Johnsson, Per and Friberg, Hans LU (2009) In Resuscitation 80. p.784-789
Abstract
AIM: To assess the prognostic value of repetitive serum samples of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and S-100B in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. METHODS: In a three-centre study, comatose patients after cardiac arrest were treated with hypothermia at 33 degrees C for 24h, regardless of cause or the initial rhythm. Serum samples were collected at 2, 24, 48 and 72h after the arrest and analysed for NSE and S-100B in a non-blinded way. The cerebral performance categories scale (CPC) was used as the outcome measure; a best CPC of 1-2 during 6 months was regarded as a good outcome, a best CPC of 3-5 a poor outcome. RESULTS: One centre was omitted in the NSE analysis due to missing 24 and 48h samples. Two partially overlapping... (More)
AIM: To assess the prognostic value of repetitive serum samples of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and S-100B in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. METHODS: In a three-centre study, comatose patients after cardiac arrest were treated with hypothermia at 33 degrees C for 24h, regardless of cause or the initial rhythm. Serum samples were collected at 2, 24, 48 and 72h after the arrest and analysed for NSE and S-100B in a non-blinded way. The cerebral performance categories scale (CPC) was used as the outcome measure; a best CPC of 1-2 during 6 months was regarded as a good outcome, a best CPC of 3-5 a poor outcome. RESULTS: One centre was omitted in the NSE analysis due to missing 24 and 48h samples. Two partially overlapping groups were studied, the NSE group (n=102) and the S-100B group (n=107). NSE at 48h >28mug/l (specificity 100%, sensitivity 67%) and S-100B >0.51mug/l at 24h (specificity 96%, sensitivity 62%) correlated with a poor outcome, and so did a rise in NSE of >2mug/l between 24 and 48h (odds ratio 9.8, CI 3.5-27.7). A majority of missing samples (n=123) were from the 2h sampling time (n=56) due to referral from other hospitals or inter-hospital transfer. CONCLUSION: NSE was a better marker than S-100B for predicting outcome after cardiac arrest and induced hypothermia. NSE above 28mug/l at 48h and a rise in NSE of more than 2mug/l between 24 and 48h were markers for a poor outcome. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Resuscitation
volume
80
pages
784 - 789
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000267837100018
  • pmid:19467754
  • scopus:67349186978
ISSN
1873-1570
DOI
10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.03.025
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2e486b40-7293-41a9-a908-c37ea50613c5 (old id 1412021)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19467754?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-06-03 15:59:51
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:40:59
@article{2e486b40-7293-41a9-a908-c37ea50613c5,
  abstract     = {AIM: To assess the prognostic value of repetitive serum samples of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and S-100B in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. METHODS: In a three-centre study, comatose patients after cardiac arrest were treated with hypothermia at 33 degrees C for 24h, regardless of cause or the initial rhythm. Serum samples were collected at 2, 24, 48 and 72h after the arrest and analysed for NSE and S-100B in a non-blinded way. The cerebral performance categories scale (CPC) was used as the outcome measure; a best CPC of 1-2 during 6 months was regarded as a good outcome, a best CPC of 3-5 a poor outcome. RESULTS: One centre was omitted in the NSE analysis due to missing 24 and 48h samples. Two partially overlapping groups were studied, the NSE group (n=102) and the S-100B group (n=107). NSE at 48h >28mug/l (specificity 100%, sensitivity 67%) and S-100B >0.51mug/l at 24h (specificity 96%, sensitivity 62%) correlated with a poor outcome, and so did a rise in NSE of >2mug/l between 24 and 48h (odds ratio 9.8, CI 3.5-27.7). A majority of missing samples (n=123) were from the 2h sampling time (n=56) due to referral from other hospitals or inter-hospital transfer. CONCLUSION: NSE was a better marker than S-100B for predicting outcome after cardiac arrest and induced hypothermia. NSE above 28mug/l at 48h and a rise in NSE of more than 2mug/l between 24 and 48h were markers for a poor outcome.},
  author       = {Rundgren, Malin and Karlsson, Torbjörn and Nielsen, Niklas and Cronberg, Tobias and Johnsson, Per and Friberg, Hans},
  issn         = {1873-1570},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {784--789},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Resuscitation},
  title        = {Neuron specific enolase and S-100B as predictors of outcome after cardiac arrest and induced hypothermia.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.03.025},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2009},
}