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Survival in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by histology and family history.

Ji, Jianguang LU ; Försti, Asta LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Lenner, Per and Hemminki, Kari LU (2009) In Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 135. p.1711-1716
Abstract
PURPOSE: Although survival has been studied for various subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), there have been few comprehensive studies to quantify the prognosis, including all specific histologies. The effect of family history on survival in NHL has not been examined. METHODS: We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios in NHL by histology and family history. RESULTS: Using diffuse centroblastic lymphoma as reference (HR 1.0), patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and hairy-cell leukemia had the best survival. Survival advantage was also noted among patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and different kinds of follicular lymphomas. For T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides showed a favorable prognosis.... (More)
PURPOSE: Although survival has been studied for various subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), there have been few comprehensive studies to quantify the prognosis, including all specific histologies. The effect of family history on survival in NHL has not been examined. METHODS: We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios in NHL by histology and family history. RESULTS: Using diffuse centroblastic lymphoma as reference (HR 1.0), patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and hairy-cell leukemia had the best survival. Survival advantage was also noted among patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and different kinds of follicular lymphomas. For T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides showed a favorable prognosis. As for survival by family history, a total of 98 familial cases were noted in our Database with a similar prognosis compared to sporadic cases in both parental and offspring generations. A non-significant familial concordance of either good or poor survival was noted among family members when probands' prognosis was stratified by survival time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide quantitative prognosis data for patients with NHL according to specific histologies. Patients with a familial NHL had a similar prognosis compared to patients with sporadic disease. The data suggest familial concordance in either good or poor survival among family members. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
volume
135
pages
1711 - 1716
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000270176900009
  • pmid:19533171
  • scopus:70349760536
ISSN
1432-1335
DOI
10.1007/s00432-009-0618-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
430ae27f-92e3-4eb3-8c5c-d80ff9597c9f (old id 1434198)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533171?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-07-03 14:53:44
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:33:20
@article{430ae27f-92e3-4eb3-8c5c-d80ff9597c9f,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: Although survival has been studied for various subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), there have been few comprehensive studies to quantify the prognosis, including all specific histologies. The effect of family history on survival in NHL has not been examined. METHODS: We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios in NHL by histology and family history. RESULTS: Using diffuse centroblastic lymphoma as reference (HR 1.0), patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and hairy-cell leukemia had the best survival. Survival advantage was also noted among patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and different kinds of follicular lymphomas. For T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides showed a favorable prognosis. As for survival by family history, a total of 98 familial cases were noted in our Database with a similar prognosis compared to sporadic cases in both parental and offspring generations. A non-significant familial concordance of either good or poor survival was noted among family members when probands' prognosis was stratified by survival time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide quantitative prognosis data for patients with NHL according to specific histologies. Patients with a familial NHL had a similar prognosis compared to patients with sporadic disease. The data suggest familial concordance in either good or poor survival among family members.},
  author       = {Ji, Jianguang and Försti, Asta and Sundquist, Jan and Lenner, Per and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1432-1335},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1711--1716},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {Survival in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by histology and family history.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-009-0618-0},
  volume       = {135},
  year         = {2009},
}