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A numerical comparison of three potential learning and forgetting models

Sikström, Sverker LU and Jaber, Mohamad Y. (2004) In International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00 92(3). p.281-294
Abstract
Researchers from various disciplines have been pursuing better understanding of learning and forgetting processes. A range of mathematical models, sometimes based on empirical data, has been developed to measure the effect of production breaks on the learning process. Thus far, researchers and practitioners have not resolved the issue of how learning and forgetting interacts. However, some of the developed models seem promising. This paper investigates and discusses three such potential models; namely, the learn-forget curve model (LFCM), the recency model (RC), and the power integration diffusion (PID) with their similarities and differences addressed. Results showed that for a moderate learning scenario, where the learning rate... (More)
Researchers from various disciplines have been pursuing better understanding of learning and forgetting processes. A range of mathematical models, sometimes based on empirical data, has been developed to measure the effect of production breaks on the learning process. Thus far, researchers and practitioners have not resolved the issue of how learning and forgetting interacts. However, some of the developed models seem promising. This paper investigates and discusses three such potential models; namely, the learn-forget curve model (LFCM), the recency model (RC), and the power integration diffusion (PID) with their similarities and differences addressed. Results showed that for a moderate learning scenario, where the learning rate classifies a task as being more cognitive than motor, the three models produced very close predictions to one another for all values of production breaks and initial processing times. Furthermore, the PID and RC models, and the PID and the LFCM models, could best be differentiated for cases characterised by high initial processing times, long production breaks, and for tasks that identified as being more motor than cognitive. Numerical results for the PID and LFCM suggested that as learning becomes slower forgetting becomes faster. This result is inconsistent with that of the RC model, which suggests that fast (slow) learners forget faster (slower). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Production breaks, LFCM, Learning, Forgetting, RC, PID
in
International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00
volume
92
issue
3
pages
281 - 294
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000225395300007
  • scopus:9544251417
ISSN
0925-5273
DOI
10.1016/j.ijpe.2003.10.019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8acd83c-13f0-4560-bf9e-a0da2bde95f6 (old id 144330)
date added to LUP
2007-07-27 09:23:55
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:44:45
@article{e8acd83c-13f0-4560-bf9e-a0da2bde95f6,
  abstract     = {Researchers from various disciplines have been pursuing better understanding of learning and forgetting processes. A range of mathematical models, sometimes based on empirical data, has been developed to measure the effect of production breaks on the learning process. Thus far, researchers and practitioners have not resolved the issue of how learning and forgetting interacts. However, some of the developed models seem promising. This paper investigates and discusses three such potential models; namely, the learn-forget curve model (LFCM), the recency model (RC), and the power integration diffusion (PID) with their similarities and differences addressed. Results showed that for a moderate learning scenario, where the learning rate classifies a task as being more cognitive than motor, the three models produced very close predictions to one another for all values of production breaks and initial processing times. Furthermore, the PID and RC models, and the PID and the LFCM models, could best be differentiated for cases characterised by high initial processing times, long production breaks, and for tasks that identified as being more motor than cognitive. Numerical results for the PID and LFCM suggested that as learning becomes slower forgetting becomes faster. This result is inconsistent with that of the RC model, which suggests that fast (slow) learners forget faster (slower).},
  author       = {Sikström, Sverker and Jaber, Mohamad Y.},
  issn         = {0925-5273},
  keyword      = {Production breaks,LFCM,Learning,Forgetting,RC,PID},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {281--294},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {A numerical comparison of three potential learning and forgetting models},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2003.10.019},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2004},
}