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Tooth loss and obesity in a defined Swedish population

Ostberg, Anna-Lena; Nyholm, Maria; Gullberg, Bo LU ; Råstam, Lennart LU and Lindblad, Ulf LU (2009) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00 37(4). p.427-433
Abstract
Aims: To explore the association between tooth loss and obesity in an adult Swedish population, and to investigate the influence of socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Methods: A cross-sectional population health survey conducted in 2001-2005 in 2816 randomly selected Swedish men and women (age: 30-74 years; participation rate 76%). Main measures were; tooth loss: < 20 remaining teeth (self-reported), general obesity: BMI >= 30 kg m(-2), abdominal obesity: waist circumference >88 in women and >102 cm in men. Adjustments were made for socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Results: 420 individuals (21.2%) had < 20 remaining teeth: 30-59 years 6.0%, 60-74 years 53.5%. Mean BMI was similar in men and women (26.9 kg... (More)
Aims: To explore the association between tooth loss and obesity in an adult Swedish population, and to investigate the influence of socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Methods: A cross-sectional population health survey conducted in 2001-2005 in 2816 randomly selected Swedish men and women (age: 30-74 years; participation rate 76%). Main measures were; tooth loss: < 20 remaining teeth (self-reported), general obesity: BMI >= 30 kg m(-2), abdominal obesity: waist circumference >88 in women and >102 cm in men. Adjustments were made for socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Results: 420 individuals (21.2%) had < 20 remaining teeth: 30-59 years 6.0%, 60-74 years 53.5%. Mean BMI was similar in men and women (26.9 kg m(-2)), however, both general and abdominal obesity was still more frequent among women (both p < 0.001). There was a significant interaction between age and tooth loss in the association with both general (p = 0.004) and abdominal obesity (p < 0.011) in men. In participants below 60 years of age, the association between tooth loss and general obesity (OR 2.17 [95% CI 1.51-3.12]) and abdominal obesity (2.23 [1.58-3.15]), respectively, was statistically significant independent of age and gender, and remained so also when accounting for differences in socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. There was no similar association in those 60 years or older. The findings in men and women were robust and concordant. Conclusions: Common mechanisms for oral health and obesity should be explored more also including longitudinal designs. The findings are important for targeting comprehensive interventions against obesity and tooth loss, especially among younger adults. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
waist circumference, tooth loss, obesity, Age, body mass index
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00
volume
37
issue
4
pages
427 - 433
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000267557900013
  • scopus:66849138222
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494808099964
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3c538710-5e61-4d39-b6a0-df1c04b34058 (old id 1462920)
date added to LUP
2009-08-31 11:02:02
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:10:50
@article{3c538710-5e61-4d39-b6a0-df1c04b34058,
  abstract     = {Aims: To explore the association between tooth loss and obesity in an adult Swedish population, and to investigate the influence of socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Methods: A cross-sectional population health survey conducted in 2001-2005 in 2816 randomly selected Swedish men and women (age: 30-74 years; participation rate 76%). Main measures were; tooth loss: &lt; 20 remaining teeth (self-reported), general obesity: BMI &gt;= 30 kg m(-2), abdominal obesity: waist circumference &gt;88 in women and &gt;102 cm in men. Adjustments were made for socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. Results: 420 individuals (21.2%) had &lt; 20 remaining teeth: 30-59 years 6.0%, 60-74 years 53.5%. Mean BMI was similar in men and women (26.9 kg m(-2)), however, both general and abdominal obesity was still more frequent among women (both p &lt; 0.001). There was a significant interaction between age and tooth loss in the association with both general (p = 0.004) and abdominal obesity (p &lt; 0.011) in men. In participants below 60 years of age, the association between tooth loss and general obesity (OR 2.17 [95% CI 1.51-3.12]) and abdominal obesity (2.23 [1.58-3.15]), respectively, was statistically significant independent of age and gender, and remained so also when accounting for differences in socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. There was no similar association in those 60 years or older. The findings in men and women were robust and concordant. Conclusions: Common mechanisms for oral health and obesity should be explored more also including longitudinal designs. The findings are important for targeting comprehensive interventions against obesity and tooth loss, especially among younger adults.},
  author       = {Ostberg, Anna-Lena and Nyholm, Maria and Gullberg, Bo and Råstam, Lennart and Lindblad, Ulf},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {waist circumference,tooth loss,obesity,Age,body mass index},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {427--433},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Tooth loss and obesity in a defined Swedish population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494808099964},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2009},
}