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The global obesity epidemic: Snacking and obesity may start with free meals during infant feeding.

Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte LU and Zetterström, Rolf (2005) In Acta Pædiatrica 94(11). p.1523-1531
Abstract
Feeding is vital for survival. The brain has strong hunger and reward mechanisms that ensure optimal food intake for adequate nutrition. The drive for feeding is particularly strong in humans whose large brains require large energy support. This starts immediately after birth; the newborn child being able to taste sucrose and suck the sweet and fat from its mother's milk. At present, mothers are generally advised to breastfeed children as often as they like, which may be up to 15 times a day. At the same time, childhood obesity is rapidly developing. One reason for the rapidly increasing prevalence of childhood obesity may be overfeeding with snack food.Conclusion: We hypothesize that non-rule breastfeeding favours the development of... (More)
Feeding is vital for survival. The brain has strong hunger and reward mechanisms that ensure optimal food intake for adequate nutrition. The drive for feeding is particularly strong in humans whose large brains require large energy support. This starts immediately after birth; the newborn child being able to taste sucrose and suck the sweet and fat from its mother's milk. At present, mothers are generally advised to breastfeed children as often as they like, which may be up to 15 times a day. At the same time, childhood obesity is rapidly developing. One reason for the rapidly increasing prevalence of childhood obesity may be overfeeding with snack food.Conclusion: We hypothesize that non-rule breastfeeding favours the development of snacking throughout the day during childhood, a habit which in turn favours the development of obesity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
satiety, obesity, hunger, Appetite regulation, reward, snacking, sucrose
in
Acta Pædiatrica
volume
94
issue
11
pages
1523 - 1531
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000233474200001
  • pmid:16303688
  • scopus:28744437027
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1080/08035250500323780
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9dfd9eab-5ac0-4a67-a0d0-2bbd2d9cbe3b (old id 147783)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16303688&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 09:26:42
date last changed
2017-05-14 04:06:37
@article{9dfd9eab-5ac0-4a67-a0d0-2bbd2d9cbe3b,
  abstract     = {Feeding is vital for survival. The brain has strong hunger and reward mechanisms that ensure optimal food intake for adequate nutrition. The drive for feeding is particularly strong in humans whose large brains require large energy support. This starts immediately after birth; the newborn child being able to taste sucrose and suck the sweet and fat from its mother's milk. At present, mothers are generally advised to breastfeed children as often as they like, which may be up to 15 times a day. At the same time, childhood obesity is rapidly developing. One reason for the rapidly increasing prevalence of childhood obesity may be overfeeding with snack food.Conclusion: We hypothesize that non-rule breastfeeding favours the development of snacking throughout the day during childhood, a habit which in turn favours the development of obesity.},
  author       = {Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte and Zetterström, Rolf},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  keyword      = {satiety,obesity,hunger,Appetite regulation,reward,snacking,sucrose},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1523--1531},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Pædiatrica},
  title        = {The global obesity epidemic: Snacking and obesity may start with free meals during infant feeding.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08035250500323780},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2005},
}