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Fat and carbohydrate intake modify the association between genetic variation in the FTO genotype and obesity.

Sonestedt, Emily LU ; Roos, Charlotta LU ; Gullberg, Bo LU ; Ericson, Ulrika LU ; Wirfält, Elisabet LU and Orho-Melander, Marju LU (2009) In The American journal of clinical nutrition 90. p.1418-1425
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) has been shown to be associated with obesity and to influence appetite regulation. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine whether dietary factors (macronutrient and fiber intakes) and leisure-time physical activity modify the association between genetic variation in FTO and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). DESIGN: A cross-sectional study examined 4839 subjects in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study with dietary data (from a modified diet history method) and information on the genetic variant FTO (rs9939609). Direct anthropometric measures were made, and leisure-time physical activity was determined from the duration participants spent on 18 different physical activities.... (More)
BACKGROUND: The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) has been shown to be associated with obesity and to influence appetite regulation. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine whether dietary factors (macronutrient and fiber intakes) and leisure-time physical activity modify the association between genetic variation in FTO and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). DESIGN: A cross-sectional study examined 4839 subjects in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study with dietary data (from a modified diet history method) and information on the genetic variant FTO (rs9939609). Direct anthropometric measures were made, and leisure-time physical activity was determined from the duration participants spent on 18 different physical activities. RESULTS: Significant interactions between energy-adjusted fat intake and FTO genotype (P = 0.04) and between carbohydrate intake and FTO genotype (P = 0.001) on BMI were observed. The observed increase in BMI across FTO genotypes was restricted to those who reported a high-fat diet, with a mean BMI of 25.3 (95% CI: 24.9, 25.6) among TT carriers and of 26.3 (95% CI: 25.8, 26.8) among AA carriers (P = 0.0001). The FTO variant was not associated with a higher BMI among subjects with lower fat intakes (BMI = 25.7 and 25.9 in TT carriers and AA carriers, respectively; P = 0.42). Among individuals with a low-carbohydrate intake, we observed a mean BMI of 25.4 for TT carriers and of 26.8 for AA carriers. The increase in BMI across genotypes was mainly restricted to individuals who reported low leisure-time physical activity (P for trend = 0.004, P for interaction = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that high-fat diets and low physical activity levels may accentuate the susceptibility to obesity by the FTO variant. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The American journal of clinical nutrition
volume
90
pages
1418 - 1425
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • wos:000270959500040
  • pmid:19726594
  • scopus:70350686380
ISSN
1938-3207
DOI
10.3945/ajcn.2009.27958
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b5957bb7-b667-4a47-b469-21e6c7e586df (old id 1483888)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19726594?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-10-05 15:10:18
date last changed
2017-06-04 04:34:33
@article{b5957bb7-b667-4a47-b469-21e6c7e586df,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) has been shown to be associated with obesity and to influence appetite regulation. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine whether dietary factors (macronutrient and fiber intakes) and leisure-time physical activity modify the association between genetic variation in FTO and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). DESIGN: A cross-sectional study examined 4839 subjects in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study with dietary data (from a modified diet history method) and information on the genetic variant FTO (rs9939609). Direct anthropometric measures were made, and leisure-time physical activity was determined from the duration participants spent on 18 different physical activities. RESULTS: Significant interactions between energy-adjusted fat intake and FTO genotype (P = 0.04) and between carbohydrate intake and FTO genotype (P = 0.001) on BMI were observed. The observed increase in BMI across FTO genotypes was restricted to those who reported a high-fat diet, with a mean BMI of 25.3 (95% CI: 24.9, 25.6) among TT carriers and of 26.3 (95% CI: 25.8, 26.8) among AA carriers (P = 0.0001). The FTO variant was not associated with a higher BMI among subjects with lower fat intakes (BMI = 25.7 and 25.9 in TT carriers and AA carriers, respectively; P = 0.42). Among individuals with a low-carbohydrate intake, we observed a mean BMI of 25.4 for TT carriers and of 26.8 for AA carriers. The increase in BMI across genotypes was mainly restricted to individuals who reported low leisure-time physical activity (P for trend = 0.004, P for interaction = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that high-fat diets and low physical activity levels may accentuate the susceptibility to obesity by the FTO variant.},
  author       = {Sonestedt, Emily and Roos, Charlotta and Gullberg, Bo and Ericson, Ulrika and Wirfält, Elisabet and Orho-Melander, Marju},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1418--1425},
  publisher    = {American Society for Clinical Nutrition},
  series       = {The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  title        = {Fat and carbohydrate intake modify the association between genetic variation in the FTO genotype and obesity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27958},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2009},
}