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Net heterotrophy in Faroe Islands clear-water lakes: causes and consequences for bacterioplankton and phytoplankton

Pålsson, Carina LU ; Kritzberg, Emma LU ; Christoffersen, K and Granéli, Wilhelm LU (2005) In Freshwater Biology 50(12). p.2011-2020
Abstract
1. Five oligotrophic clear-water lakes on the Faroe Islands were studied during August 2000. Algal and bacterial production rates, community respiration, and CO2 saturation were determined. In addition, we examined the plankton community composition (phytoplankton and heterotrophic nanoflagellates) and measured the grazing pressure exerted by common mixotrophic species on bacteria.



2. High respiration to primary production (6.6–33.2) and supersaturation of CO2 (830–2140 μatm) implied that the lakes were net heterotrophic and that the pelagic heterotrophic plankton were subsidised by allochthonous organic carbon. However, in spite of the apparent high level of net heterotrophy, primary production exceeded bacterial... (More)
1. Five oligotrophic clear-water lakes on the Faroe Islands were studied during August 2000. Algal and bacterial production rates, community respiration, and CO2 saturation were determined. In addition, we examined the plankton community composition (phytoplankton and heterotrophic nanoflagellates) and measured the grazing pressure exerted by common mixotrophic species on bacteria.



2. High respiration to primary production (6.6–33.2) and supersaturation of CO2 (830–2140 μatm) implied that the lakes were net heterotrophic and that the pelagic heterotrophic plankton were subsidised by allochthonous organic carbon. However, in spite of the apparent high level of net heterotrophy, primary production exceeded bacterial production and the food base for higher trophic levels appeared to be mainly autotrophic.



3. We suggest that the observed net heterotrophy in these lakes was a result of the oligotrophic conditions and hence low primary production in combination with an input of allochthonous C with a relatively high availability.



4. Mixotrophic phytoplankton (Cryptomonas spp., Dinobryon spp. and flagellates cf. Ochromonas spp.) constituted a large percentage of the plankton community (17–83%), possibly as a result of their capacity to exploit bacteria as a means of acquiring nutrients in these nutrient poor systems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Freshwater Biology
volume
50
issue
12
pages
2011 - 2020
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000233290000009
  • scopus:33745208799
ISSN
0046-5070
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2427.2005.01440.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
04c3bbbb-2998-4220-ada3-41b61c37499e (old id 150649)
date added to LUP
2007-06-29 07:19:10
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:01:57
@article{04c3bbbb-2998-4220-ada3-41b61c37499e,
  abstract     = {1. Five oligotrophic clear-water lakes on the Faroe Islands were studied during August 2000. Algal and bacterial production rates, community respiration, and CO2 saturation were determined. In addition, we examined the plankton community composition (phytoplankton and heterotrophic nanoflagellates) and measured the grazing pressure exerted by common mixotrophic species on bacteria.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
2. High respiration to primary production (6.6–33.2) and supersaturation of CO2 (830–2140 μatm) implied that the lakes were net heterotrophic and that the pelagic heterotrophic plankton were subsidised by allochthonous organic carbon. However, in spite of the apparent high level of net heterotrophy, primary production exceeded bacterial production and the food base for higher trophic levels appeared to be mainly autotrophic.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
3. We suggest that the observed net heterotrophy in these lakes was a result of the oligotrophic conditions and hence low primary production in combination with an input of allochthonous C with a relatively high availability.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
4. Mixotrophic phytoplankton (Cryptomonas spp., Dinobryon spp. and flagellates cf. Ochromonas spp.) constituted a large percentage of the plankton community (17–83%), possibly as a result of their capacity to exploit bacteria as a means of acquiring nutrients in these nutrient poor systems.},
  author       = {Pålsson, Carina and Kritzberg, Emma and Christoffersen, K and Granéli, Wilhelm},
  issn         = {0046-5070},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2011--2020},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Freshwater Biology},
  title        = {Net heterotrophy in Faroe Islands clear-water lakes: causes and consequences for bacterioplankton and phytoplankton},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2427.2005.01440.x},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2005},
}