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Effects of cultivar, root weight, storage and boiling on carbohydrate content in carrots (Daucus carota L)

Nyman, Margareta LU ; Svanberg, Maria; Andersson, R and Nilsson, T (2005) In Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 85(3). p.441-449
Abstract
The effects of cultivar (n = 4), root weight (n = 4), storage (S months) and boiling (7 min) and their interactions on the content of dry matter and carbohydrates were studied and ranked in carrots. Boiling had the greatest effect and had an influence on all variables except the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. The choice of cultivar was also of great importance as regards glucose, fructose and sucrose content, while dietary fibre and dry matter were much less affected, or even unaffected, by this factor. Root weight and storage were consistently of less significance than boiling and cultivar. Thus dietary fibre solubility, fructose content and the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and... (More)
The effects of cultivar (n = 4), root weight (n = 4), storage (S months) and boiling (7 min) and their interactions on the content of dry matter and carbohydrates were studied and ranked in carrots. Boiling had the greatest effect and had an influence on all variables except the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. The choice of cultivar was also of great importance as regards glucose, fructose and sucrose content, while dietary fibre and dry matter were much less affected, or even unaffected, by this factor. Root weight and storage were consistently of less significance than boiling and cultivar. Thus dietary fibre solubility, fructose content and the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose were independent of the root weight, while storage had no impact on the dry matter content. After storage the cultivar Lonto had lost more dry matter than the other cultivars (10% versus mean 1% for the others, P = 0.009) and the sugar ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose had increased in the cultivar Amarant, while it decreased in the other cultivars (P < 0.001). Furthermore, Amarant had a lower loss of sugars (35%) following boiling than the other cultivars (mean 39%, P = 0.002). Storage and boiling interacted concerning soluble and insoluble dietary fibre, fibre solubility and glucose content. It is concluded that the various factors (especially boiling and cultivar) gave rise to such differences in carbohydrate content and composition that they might be of nutritional importance. The results may thus provide a basis for selecting raw material when studying possible health effects of carrots. © 2004 Society of Chemical Industry. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
volume
85
issue
3
pages
441 - 449
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000226590300013
  • scopus:13444251573
ISSN
1097-0010
DOI
10.1002/jsfa.1983
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b309302-1fa1-4d1f-a8ea-dc7a157b582b (old id 151395)
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 10:01:29
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:46:07
@article{7b309302-1fa1-4d1f-a8ea-dc7a157b582b,
  abstract     = {The effects of cultivar (n = 4), root weight (n = 4), storage (S months) and boiling (7 min) and their interactions on the content of dry matter and carbohydrates were studied and ranked in carrots. Boiling had the greatest effect and had an influence on all variables except the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. The choice of cultivar was also of great importance as regards glucose, fructose and sucrose content, while dietary fibre and dry matter were much less affected, or even unaffected, by this factor. Root weight and storage were consistently of less significance than boiling and cultivar. Thus dietary fibre solubility, fructose content and the ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose were independent of the root weight, while storage had no impact on the dry matter content. After storage the cultivar Lonto had lost more dry matter than the other cultivars (10% versus mean 1% for the others, P = 0.009) and the sugar ratio between sucrose and the monosaccharides glucose and fructose had increased in the cultivar Amarant, while it decreased in the other cultivars (P &lt; 0.001). Furthermore, Amarant had a lower loss of sugars (35%) following boiling than the other cultivars (mean 39%, P = 0.002). Storage and boiling interacted concerning soluble and insoluble dietary fibre, fibre solubility and glucose content. It is concluded that the various factors (especially boiling and cultivar) gave rise to such differences in carbohydrate content and composition that they might be of nutritional importance. The results may thus provide a basis for selecting raw material when studying possible health effects of carrots. © 2004 Society of Chemical Industry.},
  author       = {Nyman, Margareta and Svanberg, Maria and Andersson, R and Nilsson, T},
  issn         = {1097-0010},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {441--449},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture},
  title        = {Effects of cultivar, root weight, storage and boiling on carbohydrate content in carrots (Daucus carota L)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.1983},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2005},
}