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Influence of cold acclimation on the mechanical strength of carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue

Gomez, Federico LU ; Vaughan, D; Herppich, W; Smallwood, M; Sommarin, Marianne LU ; Gekas, Vassilis LU and Sjöholm, Ingegerd LU (2004) In European Journal of Horticultural Science 69(6). p.229-234
Abstract
We have investigated the influence of cold acclimation on the mechanical strength of carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproots. Changes in the mechanical strength were monitored when cold acclimation was induced in carrot plants cultivated in a growth chamber under strict climate control and in taproots harvested from field cultivation, where the plants had been exposed to the natural variations in climate. The appearance and accumulation of an antifreeze protein in the cell wall isolated from cold-stored taproots showed that a cold acclimation process is in progress in the harvested taproot derived from carrot plants grown in the field. The force needed to slice the taproots significantly increased during the first 12 weeks of storage, where the... (More)
We have investigated the influence of cold acclimation on the mechanical strength of carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproots. Changes in the mechanical strength were monitored when cold acclimation was induced in carrot plants cultivated in a growth chamber under strict climate control and in taproots harvested from field cultivation, where the plants had been exposed to the natural variations in climate. The appearance and accumulation of an antifreeze protein in the cell wall isolated from cold-stored taproots showed that a cold acclimation process is in progress in the harvested taproot derived from carrot plants grown in the field. The force needed to slice the taproots significantly increased during the first 12 weeks of storage, where the higher concentration of the antifreeze protein indicated the highest development of cold acclimation during that period of time. The increase in tissue rigidity during cold acclimation was also shown by the increase of the Young's modulus in taproot tissue from carrot plants acclimated 11 weeks under controlled temperature conditions. After 24 weeks of storage there was a significant increase in slicing force that was accompanied by signs of cell membrane deterioration, as measured by relative electrolyte leakage. Thus, the later increase in tissue strength might be related with a senescence process. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
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in
European Journal of Horticultural Science
volume
69
issue
6
pages
229 - 234
publisher
Ulmer
external identifiers
  • wos:000226796000002
  • scopus:13844297292
ISSN
1611-4434
language
English
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yes
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58a72926-27c5-468b-be53-28f1c8592977 (old id 152070)
alternative location
http://www.ulmer.de/39oJ8G3A+.HTML
http://www.ulmer.de/QUlEPTI1MzA4Jk1JRD0xNDMzJlRJWD0wJkFST09UPTM0OTM.html?UID=0BB65E722110D298937C18B8535D4DA61BCD36F478E9DB
date added to LUP
2007-07-05 09:58:51
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@article{58a72926-27c5-468b-be53-28f1c8592977,
  abstract     = {We have investigated the influence of cold acclimation on the mechanical strength of carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproots. Changes in the mechanical strength were monitored when cold acclimation was induced in carrot plants cultivated in a growth chamber under strict climate control and in taproots harvested from field cultivation, where the plants had been exposed to the natural variations in climate. The appearance and accumulation of an antifreeze protein in the cell wall isolated from cold-stored taproots showed that a cold acclimation process is in progress in the harvested taproot derived from carrot plants grown in the field. The force needed to slice the taproots significantly increased during the first 12 weeks of storage, where the higher concentration of the antifreeze protein indicated the highest development of cold acclimation during that period of time. The increase in tissue rigidity during cold acclimation was also shown by the increase of the Young's modulus in taproot tissue from carrot plants acclimated 11 weeks under controlled temperature conditions. After 24 weeks of storage there was a significant increase in slicing force that was accompanied by signs of cell membrane deterioration, as measured by relative electrolyte leakage. Thus, the later increase in tissue strength might be related with a senescence process.},
  author       = {Gomez, Federico and Vaughan, D and Herppich, W and Smallwood, M and Sommarin, Marianne and Gekas, Vassilis and Sjöholm, Ingegerd},
  issn         = {1611-4434},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {229--234},
  publisher    = {Ulmer},
  series       = {European Journal of Horticultural Science},
  title        = {Influence of cold acclimation on the mechanical strength of carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {2004},
}