Advanced

Slowing of Alternating Forearm Movements Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Community-Dwelling Older People.

Bramell-Risberg, Eva LU ; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt LU and Elmståhl, Sölve LU (2010) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 29(5). p.457-466
Abstract
Background/Aims: Motor impairment is an important aspect of cognitive decline in older adults. It has been suggested that complex motor control is affected earlier than gross motor control. The aims were to investigate if complex hand motor function was more affected than gross motor function in cognitively impaired older subjects, and to present reference values. Methods: Alternating forearm movements and grip strength were studied in 301 cases, 419 intermediates and 1,207 controls, aged 60-93 years, controlling for demographic, health-related and functional factors and comorbidity. Global cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination, and episodic memory by 3-word delayed recall. Grip strength was assessed by the... (More)
Background/Aims: Motor impairment is an important aspect of cognitive decline in older adults. It has been suggested that complex motor control is affected earlier than gross motor control. The aims were to investigate if complex hand motor function was more affected than gross motor function in cognitively impaired older subjects, and to present reference values. Methods: Alternating forearm movements and grip strength were studied in 301 cases, 419 intermediates and 1,207 controls, aged 60-93 years, controlling for demographic, health-related and functional factors and comorbidity. Global cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination, and episodic memory by 3-word delayed recall. Grip strength was assessed by the Grippit(R). The frequency of alternating movements during 10 s was registered electronically. Results: Alternating movements but not grip strength was associated with cognitive impairment (right: p = 0.006; left: p = 0.022). The mean alternating movements for the 70-year-old male cases compared to the controls were 2.3 versus 2.5 Hz for the right, and 2.2 versus 2.4 Hz for the left arm (p < 0.05), and for the 60-year-old women 2.0 versus 2.3 Hz for the right arm (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Complex but not gross hand motor function is associated with early cognitive impairment. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
29
issue
5
pages
457 - 466
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000278387800010
  • pmid:20502020
  • scopus:77952484805
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000305093
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0ce42696-1a33-4421-a464-ec412a2d359c (old id 1609950)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20502020?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-06-02 11:49:58
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:57:32
@article{0ce42696-1a33-4421-a464-ec412a2d359c,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Motor impairment is an important aspect of cognitive decline in older adults. It has been suggested that complex motor control is affected earlier than gross motor control. The aims were to investigate if complex hand motor function was more affected than gross motor function in cognitively impaired older subjects, and to present reference values. Methods: Alternating forearm movements and grip strength were studied in 301 cases, 419 intermediates and 1,207 controls, aged 60-93 years, controlling for demographic, health-related and functional factors and comorbidity. Global cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination, and episodic memory by 3-word delayed recall. Grip strength was assessed by the Grippit(R). The frequency of alternating movements during 10 s was registered electronically. Results: Alternating movements but not grip strength was associated with cognitive impairment (right: p = 0.006; left: p = 0.022). The mean alternating movements for the 70-year-old male cases compared to the controls were 2.3 versus 2.5 Hz for the right, and 2.2 versus 2.4 Hz for the left arm (p &lt; 0.05), and for the 60-year-old women 2.0 versus 2.3 Hz for the right arm (p &lt; 0.05). Conclusion: Complex but not gross hand motor function is associated with early cognitive impairment.},
  author       = {Bramell-Risberg, Eva and Jarnlo, Gun-Britt and Elmståhl, Sölve},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {457--466},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Slowing of Alternating Forearm Movements Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Community-Dwelling Older People.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000305093},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2010},
}