Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Portfolio as a method for continuous assessment in an undergraduate health education programme.

Thomé, Göran LU ; Hovenberg, Hans LU and Edgren, Gudrun LU (2006) In Medical Teacher 28(6). p.171-176
Abstract
A portfolio assessment system has been introduced into a biomedical science programme to promote both continuous learning and deep approaches to learning. Attention has been focused on creating harmony between the assessment system and the PBL curriculum of the programme. Biomedicine and laboratory work are central in the curriculum. The portfolio included evidence of laboratory work, personal reflections and certificates from the PBL tutor. The portfolio was assessed on three occasions over 20 weeks. The grades were 'pass' or 'fail'. The tutor certificate appeared to be a crucial part of the portfolio since a 'fail' in this part usually led to an overall 'fail'. Both students and teachers were concerned about ensuring that enough factual... (More)
A portfolio assessment system has been introduced into a biomedical science programme to promote both continuous learning and deep approaches to learning. Attention has been focused on creating harmony between the assessment system and the PBL curriculum of the programme. Biomedicine and laboratory work are central in the curriculum. The portfolio included evidence of laboratory work, personal reflections and certificates from the PBL tutor. The portfolio was assessed on three occasions over 20 weeks. The grades were 'pass' or 'fail'. The tutor certificate appeared to be a crucial part of the portfolio since a 'fail' in this part usually led to an overall 'fail'. Both students and teachers were concerned about ensuring that enough factual knowledge, as measured by a traditional test, had been achieved. The agreement was good enough for the pass or fail level but some expected differences were found at the detailed level. The course, including the portfolio, was evaluated orally during weekly whole-group meetings and using a questionnaire at the end. The students felt comfortable with the portfolio system and preferred it to a traditional test. The teachers felt that they needed to develop their teacher-student discussion skills and to improve their feedback on the reflections. Peer assessment between students is proposed as a line of action to enhance the credibility of the crucial tutor certificate. The portfolio might be an efficient tool for the students to concentrate their efforts on the most central concepts of medical laboratory work. The model will be developed through further discussions and better consensus among faculty. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
SoTL
categories
Higher Education
in
Medical Teacher
volume
28
issue
6
pages
171 - 176
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000242451600023
  • scopus:33750500313
ISSN
0142-159X
DOI
10.1080/01421590600776511
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Faculty of Medicine (000022000), Mucosal biology (013212033), Faculty office (013100001), Centre for Teaching and Learning (013100003), BMC Biomedical Centre (0130322000)
id
5360568a-efaa-4066-961d-f65a5856d741 (old id 163545)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17074697&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:44:51
date last changed
2021-02-17 03:16:44
@article{5360568a-efaa-4066-961d-f65a5856d741,
  abstract     = {A portfolio assessment system has been introduced into a biomedical science programme to promote both continuous learning and deep approaches to learning. Attention has been focused on creating harmony between the assessment system and the PBL curriculum of the programme. Biomedicine and laboratory work are central in the curriculum. The portfolio included evidence of laboratory work, personal reflections and certificates from the PBL tutor. The portfolio was assessed on three occasions over 20 weeks. The grades were 'pass' or 'fail'. The tutor certificate appeared to be a crucial part of the portfolio since a 'fail' in this part usually led to an overall 'fail'. Both students and teachers were concerned about ensuring that enough factual knowledge, as measured by a traditional test, had been achieved. The agreement was good enough for the pass or fail level but some expected differences were found at the detailed level. The course, including the portfolio, was evaluated orally during weekly whole-group meetings and using a questionnaire at the end. The students felt comfortable with the portfolio system and preferred it to a traditional test. The teachers felt that they needed to develop their teacher-student discussion skills and to improve their feedback on the reflections. Peer assessment between students is proposed as a line of action to enhance the credibility of the crucial tutor certificate. The portfolio might be an efficient tool for the students to concentrate their efforts on the most central concepts of medical laboratory work. The model will be developed through further discussions and better consensus among faculty.},
  author       = {Thomé, Göran and Hovenberg, Hans and Edgren, Gudrun},
  issn         = {0142-159X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {171--176},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Medical Teacher},
  title        = {Portfolio as a method for continuous assessment in an undergraduate health education programme.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01421590600776511},
  doi          = {10.1080/01421590600776511},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2006},
}