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Magic at the marketplace: Choice blindness for the taste of jam and the smell of tea.

Hall, Lars LU ; Johansson, Petter LU ; Tärning, Betty LU ; Sikström, Sverker LU and Deutgen, Therese (2010) In Cognition 117. p.54-61
Abstract
We set up a tasting venue at a local supermarket and invited passerby shoppers to sample two different varieties of jam and tea, and to decide which alternative in each pair they preferred the most. Immediately after the participants had made their choice, we asked them to again sample the chosen alternative, and to verbally explain why they chose the way they did. At this point we secretly switched the contents of the sample containers, so that the outcome of the choice became the opposite of what the participants intended. In total, no more than a third of the manipulated trials were detected. Even for remarkably different tastes like Cinnamon-Apple and bitter Grapefruit, or the smell of Mango and Pernod was no more than half of all... (More)
We set up a tasting venue at a local supermarket and invited passerby shoppers to sample two different varieties of jam and tea, and to decide which alternative in each pair they preferred the most. Immediately after the participants had made their choice, we asked them to again sample the chosen alternative, and to verbally explain why they chose the way they did. At this point we secretly switched the contents of the sample containers, so that the outcome of the choice became the opposite of what the participants intended. In total, no more than a third of the manipulated trials were detected. Even for remarkably different tastes like Cinnamon-Apple and bitter Grapefruit, or the smell of Mango and Pernod was no more than half of all trials detected, thus demonstrating considerable levels of choice blindness for the taste and smell of two different consumer goods. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognition
volume
117
pages
54 - 61
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000282899200005
  • pmid:20637455
  • scopus:77956226148
ISSN
0010-0277
DOI
10.1016/j.cognition.2010.06.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52cc857a-0c24-48f4-b81f-a0407a2ebfe9 (old id 1644868)
date added to LUP
2010-08-23 11:39:37
date last changed
2018-06-24 04:15:57
@article{52cc857a-0c24-48f4-b81f-a0407a2ebfe9,
  abstract     = {We set up a tasting venue at a local supermarket and invited passerby shoppers to sample two different varieties of jam and tea, and to decide which alternative in each pair they preferred the most. Immediately after the participants had made their choice, we asked them to again sample the chosen alternative, and to verbally explain why they chose the way they did. At this point we secretly switched the contents of the sample containers, so that the outcome of the choice became the opposite of what the participants intended. In total, no more than a third of the manipulated trials were detected. Even for remarkably different tastes like Cinnamon-Apple and bitter Grapefruit, or the smell of Mango and Pernod was no more than half of all trials detected, thus demonstrating considerable levels of choice blindness for the taste and smell of two different consumer goods.},
  author       = {Hall, Lars and Johansson, Petter and Tärning, Betty and Sikström, Sverker and Deutgen, Therese},
  issn         = {0010-0277},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {54--61},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Cognition},
  title        = {Magic at the marketplace: Choice blindness for the taste of jam and the smell of tea.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2010.06.010},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2010},
}