Advanced

Diet and body constitution in relation to sub-groups of breast cancer defined by tumour grade, proliferation and key cell cycle regulators.

Borgquist, Signe LU ; Wirfält, Elisabet LU ; Jirström, Karin LU ; Anagnostaki, Lola; Gullberg, Bo LU ; Berglund, Göran LU ; Manjer, Jonas LU and Landberg, Göran LU (2007) In Breast Cancer Research 9(1). p.11-11
Abstract
Background The general lack of clear associations between diet and breast cancer in epidemiological studies may partly be explained by the fact that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that may have disparate genetic associations and different aetiological bases. Method A total of 346 incident breast cancers in a prospective cohort of 17,035 women enrolled in the Malmo Diet and Cancer study ( Sweden) were subcategorized according to conventional pathology parameters, proliferation and expression of key cell cycle regulators. Subcategories were compared with prediagnostic diet and body measurements using analysis of variance. Results A large hip circumference and high body mass index were associated with high grade tumours ( P = 0.03... (More)
Background The general lack of clear associations between diet and breast cancer in epidemiological studies may partly be explained by the fact that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that may have disparate genetic associations and different aetiological bases. Method A total of 346 incident breast cancers in a prospective cohort of 17,035 women enrolled in the Malmo Diet and Cancer study ( Sweden) were subcategorized according to conventional pathology parameters, proliferation and expression of key cell cycle regulators. Subcategories were compared with prediagnostic diet and body measurements using analysis of variance. Results A large hip circumference and high body mass index were associated with high grade tumours ( P = 0.03 and 0.009, respectively), whereas low energy and unadjusted fat intakes were associated with high proliferation ( P = 0.03 and 0.004, respectively). Low intakes of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also associated with high proliferation ( P = 0.02, 0.004 and 0.003, respectively). Low energy and unadjusted fat intakes were associated with cyclin D-1 overexpression ( P = 0.02 and 0.007, respectively), whereas cyclin E overexpression was positively correlated with fat intake. Oestrogen receptor status and expression of the tumour suppressor gene p27 were not associated with either diet or body constitution. Conclusion Low energy and low total fat ( polyunsaturated fatty acids in particular) intakes, and high body mass index were associated with relatively more malignant breast tumours. Dietary behaviours and body constitution may be associated with specific types of breast cancer defined by conventional pathology parameters and cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression. Further studies including healthy control individuals are needed to confirm our results. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Breast Cancer Research
volume
9
issue
1
pages
11 - 11
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000245810800017
  • scopus:34248144554
ISSN
1465-5411
DOI
10.1186/bcr1644
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f81c3766-09af-4027-984d-15dbdadecd4a (old id 164641)
alternative location
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=17254341
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 11:06:29
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:02:53
@article{f81c3766-09af-4027-984d-15dbdadecd4a,
  abstract     = {Background The general lack of clear associations between diet and breast cancer in epidemiological studies may partly be explained by the fact that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that may have disparate genetic associations and different aetiological bases. Method A total of 346 incident breast cancers in a prospective cohort of 17,035 women enrolled in the Malmo Diet and Cancer study ( Sweden) were subcategorized according to conventional pathology parameters, proliferation and expression of key cell cycle regulators. Subcategories were compared with prediagnostic diet and body measurements using analysis of variance. Results A large hip circumference and high body mass index were associated with high grade tumours ( P = 0.03 and 0.009, respectively), whereas low energy and unadjusted fat intakes were associated with high proliferation ( P = 0.03 and 0.004, respectively). Low intakes of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also associated with high proliferation ( P = 0.02, 0.004 and 0.003, respectively). Low energy and unadjusted fat intakes were associated with cyclin D-1 overexpression ( P = 0.02 and 0.007, respectively), whereas cyclin E overexpression was positively correlated with fat intake. Oestrogen receptor status and expression of the tumour suppressor gene p27 were not associated with either diet or body constitution. Conclusion Low energy and low total fat ( polyunsaturated fatty acids in particular) intakes, and high body mass index were associated with relatively more malignant breast tumours. Dietary behaviours and body constitution may be associated with specific types of breast cancer defined by conventional pathology parameters and cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression. Further studies including healthy control individuals are needed to confirm our results.},
  author       = {Borgquist, Signe and Wirfält, Elisabet and Jirström, Karin and Anagnostaki, Lola and Gullberg, Bo and Berglund, Göran and Manjer, Jonas and Landberg, Göran},
  issn         = {1465-5411},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {11--11},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Breast Cancer Research},
  title        = {Diet and body constitution in relation to sub-groups of breast cancer defined by tumour grade, proliferation and key cell cycle regulators.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/bcr1644},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2007},
}