Advanced

Keeping an eye on gestures: Visual perception of gestures in face-to-face communication

Gullberg, Marianne LU and Holmqvist, Kenneth LU (1999) In Pragmatics & Cognition 7(1). p.35-63
Abstract
Since listeners usually look at the speaker's face, gestural information has to be absorbed through peripheral visual perception. In the literature, it has been suggested that listeners look at gestures under certain circumstances: 1) when the articulation of the gesture is peripheral; 2) when the speech channel is insufficient for comprehension; and 3) when the speaker him- or herself indicates that the gesture is worthy of attention. The research here reported employs eye tracking techniques to study the perception of gestures in face-to-face interaction. The improved control over the listener's visual channel allows us to test the validity of the above claims. We present preliminary findings substantiating claims 1 and 3, and relate... (More)
Since listeners usually look at the speaker's face, gestural information has to be absorbed through peripheral visual perception. In the literature, it has been suggested that listeners look at gestures under certain circumstances: 1) when the articulation of the gesture is peripheral; 2) when the speech channel is insufficient for comprehension; and 3) when the speaker him- or herself indicates that the gesture is worthy of attention. The research here reported employs eye tracking techniques to study the perception of gestures in face-to-face interaction. The improved control over the listener's visual channel allows us to test the validity of the above claims. We present preliminary findings substantiating claims 1 and 3, and relate them to theoretical proposals in the literature and to the issue of how visual and cognitive attention are related. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
visual perception, gesture, interaction, eye movements
in
Pragmatics & Cognition
volume
7
issue
1
pages
35 - 63
publisher
John Benjamins Publishing Company
external identifiers
  • scopus:84989402496
ISSN
0929-0907
DOI
10.1075/pc.7.1.04gul
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
134628ba-4da0-4d54-8640-29c22603c63d (old id 1692758)
date added to LUP
2010-10-20 08:46:47
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:53:32
@article{134628ba-4da0-4d54-8640-29c22603c63d,
  abstract     = {Since listeners usually look at the speaker's face, gestural information has to be absorbed through peripheral visual perception. In the literature, it has been suggested that listeners look at gestures under certain circumstances: 1) when the articulation of the gesture is peripheral; 2) when the speech channel is insufficient for comprehension; and 3) when the speaker him- or herself indicates that the gesture is worthy of attention. The research here reported employs eye tracking techniques to study the perception of gestures in face-to-face interaction. The improved control over the listener's visual channel allows us to test the validity of the above claims. We present preliminary findings substantiating claims 1 and 3, and relate them to theoretical proposals in the literature and to the issue of how visual and cognitive attention are related.},
  author       = {Gullberg, Marianne and Holmqvist, Kenneth},
  issn         = {0929-0907},
  keyword      = {visual perception,gesture,interaction,eye movements},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {35--63},
  publisher    = {John Benjamins Publishing Company},
  series       = {Pragmatics & Cognition},
  title        = {Keeping an eye on gestures: Visual perception of gestures in face-to-face communication},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/pc.7.1.04gul},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {1999},
}