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Malt in Combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus Increases Concentrations of Butyric Acid in the Distal Colon and Serum in Rats Compared with Other Barley Products but Decreases Viable Counts of Cecal Bifidobacteria.

Bränning, Camilla LU and Nyman, Margareta LU (2011) In Journal of Nutrition 141. p.101-107
Abstract
Several substances, including glutamine and propionic acid but in particular butyric acid, have been proposed to be important for colonic health. β-Glucans lead to the formation of comparatively high amounts of butyric acid, and germinated barley foodstuff obtained from brewer's spent grain (BSG), containing high amounts of β-glucans and glutamine, has been reported to reduce the inflammatory response in the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. The present study examines how 3 barley products, whole grain barley, malt, and BSG, affect SCFA in the hindgut and serum of rats and whether the addition of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 271 to each of these diets would have further effects. Amino acids in plasma and the cecal composition of the... (More)
Several substances, including glutamine and propionic acid but in particular butyric acid, have been proposed to be important for colonic health. β-Glucans lead to the formation of comparatively high amounts of butyric acid, and germinated barley foodstuff obtained from brewer's spent grain (BSG), containing high amounts of β-glucans and glutamine, has been reported to reduce the inflammatory response in the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. The present study examines how 3 barley products, whole grain barley, malt, and BSG, affect SCFA in the hindgut and serum of rats and whether the addition of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 271 to each of these diets would have further effects. Amino acids in plasma and the cecal composition of the microbiota were also analyzed. The butyric acid concentration in the distal colon and serum was higher in the malt groups than in the other groups as was the serum concentration of propionic acid. The concentrations of propionic and butyric acids were higher in the cecum and serum of rats given L. rhamnosus than in those not given this strain. The proportion of plasma glutamine and the cecal number of bifidobacteria were lower in the malt groups than in the other groups. L. rhamnosus decreased the number of cecal bifidobacteria, whereas plasma glutamine was unaffected. We conclude that malt together with L. rhamnosus 271 had greater effects on propionic and butyric acid concentrations in rats than the other barley products. This is interesting when developing food with effects on colonic health. (Less)
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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Nutrition
volume
141
pages
101 - 107
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000285893900017
  • pmid:21106924
  • scopus:78650480716
  • pmid:21106924
ISSN
1541-6100
DOI
10.3945/jn.110.122226
project
ANTIDIABETIC FOOD CENTRE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry (011001300)
id
ec004295-33e2-45b0-8ec4-9924fcb8a272 (old id 1731554)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:09:35
date last changed
2021-05-25 03:26:54
@article{ec004295-33e2-45b0-8ec4-9924fcb8a272,
  abstract     = {Several substances, including glutamine and propionic acid but in particular butyric acid, have been proposed to be important for colonic health. β-Glucans lead to the formation of comparatively high amounts of butyric acid, and germinated barley foodstuff obtained from brewer's spent grain (BSG), containing high amounts of β-glucans and glutamine, has been reported to reduce the inflammatory response in the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. The present study examines how 3 barley products, whole grain barley, malt, and BSG, affect SCFA in the hindgut and serum of rats and whether the addition of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 271 to each of these diets would have further effects. Amino acids in plasma and the cecal composition of the microbiota were also analyzed. The butyric acid concentration in the distal colon and serum was higher in the malt groups than in the other groups as was the serum concentration of propionic acid. The concentrations of propionic and butyric acids were higher in the cecum and serum of rats given L. rhamnosus than in those not given this strain. The proportion of plasma glutamine and the cecal number of bifidobacteria were lower in the malt groups than in the other groups. L. rhamnosus decreased the number of cecal bifidobacteria, whereas plasma glutamine was unaffected. We conclude that malt together with L. rhamnosus 271 had greater effects on propionic and butyric acid concentrations in rats than the other barley products. This is interesting when developing food with effects on colonic health.},
  author       = {Bränning, Camilla and Nyman, Margareta},
  issn         = {1541-6100},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {101--107},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Nutrition},
  title        = {Malt in Combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus Increases Concentrations of Butyric Acid in the Distal Colon and Serum in Rats Compared with Other Barley Products but Decreases Viable Counts of Cecal Bifidobacteria.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.122226},
  doi          = {10.3945/jn.110.122226},
  volume       = {141},
  year         = {2011},
}