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Survival after operations for ischaemic bowel disease

Wadman, Maria LU ; Syk, I. LU and Elmstahl, S. LU (2000) In European Journal of Surgery 166(11). p.872-877
Abstract

Objective: To find out what factors influence the outcome of operations for ischaemic bowel disease. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Main outcome measures: Morbidity and mortality. Subjects: 74 patients, mean age 75 years (range 40-98), operated on for acute bowel ischaemia between 1987 and 1996. Results: A total of 75 emergency operations were done, including 42 bowel-resections, one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, and one thrombectomy. Thirty-one patients had exploration alone because of extensive gangrene. These explorations were performed in 11 of 14 (79%) patients aged >84 years; 18 of 40 (45%) patients aged 71-84 years and 2 of 21 (9%) patients aged <71 years, (p < 0.001). Of the... (More)

Objective: To find out what factors influence the outcome of operations for ischaemic bowel disease. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Main outcome measures: Morbidity and mortality. Subjects: 74 patients, mean age 75 years (range 40-98), operated on for acute bowel ischaemia between 1987 and 1996. Results: A total of 75 emergency operations were done, including 42 bowel-resections, one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, and one thrombectomy. Thirty-one patients had exploration alone because of extensive gangrene. These explorations were performed in 11 of 14 (79%) patients aged >84 years; 18 of 40 (45%) patients aged 71-84 years and 2 of 21 (9%) patients aged <71 years, (p < 0.001). Of the 14 patients over 84 years old only one survived more than 30 days, compared with 12 of 40 (30%) aged 71-84 years, and 17 of 21 (81%) younger than 71 years (p < 0.001). Operation within 6 hours of admission resulted in significantly better survival compared with operations done after more than 6 hours delay (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Advanced age was a strong risk factor for death after operation for ischaemic bowel disease, and there was a higher incidence of unresectable gangrene. Delay in surgical intervention was associated with increasing mortality.

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type
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bowel ischaemia, Bowel resection, Elderly, Mortality, Splanchnic, Surgery
in
European Journal of Surgery
volume
166
issue
11
pages
872 - 877
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:11097154
  • scopus:0033758246
ISSN
1102-4151
DOI
10.1080/110241500447263
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
19d817f3-9488-4385-9119-079c770d58c6
alternative location
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/110241500447263
date added to LUP
2019-06-19 10:56:36
date last changed
2021-05-11 05:40:54
@article{19d817f3-9488-4385-9119-079c770d58c6,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To find out what factors influence the outcome of operations for ischaemic bowel disease. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Main outcome measures: Morbidity and mortality. Subjects: 74 patients, mean age 75 years (range 40-98), operated on for acute bowel ischaemia between 1987 and 1996. Results: A total of 75 emergency operations were done, including 42 bowel-resections, one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, and one thrombectomy. Thirty-one patients had exploration alone because of extensive gangrene. These explorations were performed in 11 of 14 (79%) patients aged &gt;84 years; 18 of 40 (45%) patients aged 71-84 years and 2 of 21 (9%) patients aged &lt;71 years, (p &lt; 0.001). Of the 14 patients over 84 years old only one survived more than 30 days, compared with 12 of 40 (30%) aged 71-84 years, and 17 of 21 (81%) younger than 71 years (p &lt; 0.001). Operation within 6 hours of admission resulted in significantly better survival compared with operations done after more than 6 hours delay (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Advanced age was a strong risk factor for death after operation for ischaemic bowel disease, and there was a higher incidence of unresectable gangrene. Delay in surgical intervention was associated with increasing mortality.</p>},
  author       = {Wadman, Maria and Syk, I. and Elmstahl, S.},
  issn         = {1102-4151},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {872--877},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Survival after operations for ischaemic bowel disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/110241500447263},
  doi          = {10.1080/110241500447263},
  volume       = {166},
  year         = {2000},
}