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Discordant xenografts : different outcome after mouse and rat neural tissue transplantation to guinea-pigs

Larsson, L C LU ; Duan, W M LU and Widner, H LU (1999) In Brain Research Bulletin 49(5). p.76-367
Abstract

Embryonic neural tissue obtained from other species has been considered as a donor tissue source in repair strategies for human neurodegenerative disorders. The neuro- and immunobiology of distantly related species combinations, discordant xenografts, need to be characterised. For this purpose, a small animal model would be an important research tool. Adult guinea-pigs, and adult rats as controls, received intrastriatal grafts of either mouse or rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue. The survival rates and types of host immune response were assessed at 2 weeks after grafting using stereological techniques and semi-quantitative evaluations. In the mouse-to-guinea-pig group, all transplants were rejected and no tyrosine... (More)

Embryonic neural tissue obtained from other species has been considered as a donor tissue source in repair strategies for human neurodegenerative disorders. The neuro- and immunobiology of distantly related species combinations, discordant xenografts, need to be characterised. For this purpose, a small animal model would be an important research tool. Adult guinea-pigs, and adult rats as controls, received intrastriatal grafts of either mouse or rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue. The survival rates and types of host immune response were assessed at 2 weeks after grafting using stereological techniques and semi-quantitative evaluations. In the mouse-to-guinea-pig group, all transplants were rejected and no tyrosine hydroxylase-immuno reactive (TH-IR) cells remained. In the rat-to-guinea-pig group, there was good survival of TH-IR cells (5050 SEM+/-1550), similar to that in the rat-to-rat group (4900 SEM+/-1540). In the mouse-to-rat group, half of the animals had no surviving TH-IR cells (520 SEM+/-230 for the whole group). These species combinations offer inexpensive, efficient, and suitable conditions to study important survival factors for discordant xenogeneic neural tissue transplants. The factors responsible for the divergent graft outcomes between the two combinations might provide clues on how to manipulate xenogeneic tissue to increase survival rates in the future.

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keywords
Animals, Astrocytes, Complement System Proteins, Corpus Striatum, Female, Fetal Tissue Transplantation, Graft Survival, Guinea Pigs, Hemolysis, Histocompatibility Antigens, Immunoglobulins, Macrophage-1 Antigen, Mesencephalon, Mice, Microglia, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Transplantation, Heterologous, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Brain Research Bulletin
volume
49
issue
5
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033565679
ISSN
0361-9230
DOI
10.1016/S0361-9230(99)00074-X
language
English
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yes
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1ddfa1d5-b4c9-4fc1-8619-75649324bc9d
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2017-04-19 18:23:24
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2017-04-28 11:58:35
@article{1ddfa1d5-b4c9-4fc1-8619-75649324bc9d,
  abstract     = {<p>Embryonic neural tissue obtained from other species has been considered as a donor tissue source in repair strategies for human neurodegenerative disorders. The neuro- and immunobiology of distantly related species combinations, discordant xenografts, need to be characterised. For this purpose, a small animal model would be an important research tool. Adult guinea-pigs, and adult rats as controls, received intrastriatal grafts of either mouse or rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue. The survival rates and types of host immune response were assessed at 2 weeks after grafting using stereological techniques and semi-quantitative evaluations. In the mouse-to-guinea-pig group, all transplants were rejected and no tyrosine hydroxylase-immuno reactive (TH-IR) cells remained. In the rat-to-guinea-pig group, there was good survival of TH-IR cells (5050 SEM+/-1550), similar to that in the rat-to-rat group (4900 SEM+/-1540). In the mouse-to-rat group, half of the animals had no surviving TH-IR cells (520 SEM+/-230 for the whole group). These species combinations offer inexpensive, efficient, and suitable conditions to study important survival factors for discordant xenogeneic neural tissue transplants. The factors responsible for the divergent graft outcomes between the two combinations might provide clues on how to manipulate xenogeneic tissue to increase survival rates in the future.</p>},
  author       = {Larsson, L C and Duan, W M and Widner, H},
  issn         = {0361-9230},
  keyword      = {Animals,Astrocytes,Complement System Proteins,Corpus Striatum,Female,Fetal Tissue Transplantation,Graft Survival,Guinea Pigs,Hemolysis,Histocompatibility Antigens,Immunoglobulins,Macrophage-1 Antigen,Mesencephalon,Mice,Microglia,Rats,Rats, Sprague-Dawley,Transplantation, Heterologous,Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {76--367},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Brain Research Bulletin},
  title        = {Discordant xenografts : different outcome after mouse and rat neural tissue transplantation to guinea-pigs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0361-9230(99)00074-X},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {1999},
}