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Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: The European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

Schulz, M; Lahmann, PH; Boeing, H; Hoffmann, K; Allen, N; Key, TJA; Bingham, S; Wirfält, Elisabet LU ; Berglund, Göran LU and Lundin, E, et al. (2005) In Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 14(11). p.2531-2535
Abstract
Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were... (More)
Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were done. Results: Total intake of fruit and vegetables, separately or combined, as well as subgroups of vegetables (fruiting, root, leafy vegetables, cabbages) was unrelated to risk of ovarian cancer. A high intake of garlic/onion vegetables was associated with a borderline significant reduced risk of this cancer. The examination by histologic subtype indicated some differential effects of fruit and vegetable intake on ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion: Overall, a high intake of fruits and vegetables did not seem to protect from ovarian cancer. Garlic/onion vegetables may exert a beneficial effect. The study of the histologic subtype of the tumor warrants further investigation. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
volume
14
issue
11
pages
2531 - 2535
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • pmid:16284374
  • wos:000233351100012
  • scopus:28644441431
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0159
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8a39cbf7-25a4-4fe8-890f-8d1384976a92 (old id 213271)
date added to LUP
2007-08-13 14:55:39
date last changed
2017-06-25 04:25:28
@article{8a39cbf7-25a4-4fe8-890f-8d1384976a92,
  abstract     = {Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were done. Results: Total intake of fruit and vegetables, separately or combined, as well as subgroups of vegetables (fruiting, root, leafy vegetables, cabbages) was unrelated to risk of ovarian cancer. A high intake of garlic/onion vegetables was associated with a borderline significant reduced risk of this cancer. The examination by histologic subtype indicated some differential effects of fruit and vegetable intake on ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion: Overall, a high intake of fruits and vegetables did not seem to protect from ovarian cancer. Garlic/onion vegetables may exert a beneficial effect. The study of the histologic subtype of the tumor warrants further investigation.},
  author       = {Schulz, M and Lahmann, PH and Boeing, H and Hoffmann, K and Allen, N and Key, TJA and Bingham, S and Wirfält, Elisabet and Berglund, Göran and Lundin, E and Hallmans, G and Lukanova, A and Garcia, CM and Gonzalez, CA and Tormo, MJ and Quiros, JR and Ardanaz, E and Larranaga, N and Lund, E and Gram, IT and Skeie, G and Peeters, PHM and van Gils, CH and Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB and Buchner, FL and Pasanisi, P and Galasso, R and Palli, D and Tumino, R and Vineis, P and Trichopoulou, A and Kalapothaki, V and Trichopoulos, D and Chang-Claude, J and Linseisen, J and Boutron-Ruault, MC and Touillaud, M and Clavel-Chapelon, F and Olsen, A and Tjonneland, A and Overvad, K and Tetsche, M and Jenab, M and Norat, T and Kaaks, R and Riboli, E},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2531--2535},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention},
  title        = {Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: The European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0159},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2005},
}