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Probiotics lower plasma glucose in the high-fat fed C57BL/6J mouse.

Axling, Ulrika LU ; Bränning, Camilla; Ahrné, Siv; Molin, Göran; Alenfall, J; Önning, Gunilla; Nyman, Margareta and Holm, C (2010) In Beneficial microbes 1(2). p.189-196
Abstract
Today, the gut microbiota is considered a key organ in host nutritional metabolism and recent data have suggested that alterations in gut microbiota contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Accordingly, a whole range of beneficial effects relating to inflammation and gut health have been observed following administration of probiotics to both humans and different animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of an oral probiotic supplement, Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313, to high-fat diet (HFD) fed C57BL/6J mice, a model of human obesity and early diabetes. The mice were fed the experimental diets for 20 weeks, after which the HFD had induced an insulin-resistant state in both... (More)
Today, the gut microbiota is considered a key organ in host nutritional metabolism and recent data have suggested that alterations in gut microbiota contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Accordingly, a whole range of beneficial effects relating to inflammation and gut health have been observed following administration of probiotics to both humans and different animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of an oral probiotic supplement, Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313, to high-fat diet (HFD) fed C57BL/6J mice, a model of human obesity and early diabetes. The mice were fed the experimental diets for 20 weeks, after which the HFD had induced an insulin-resistant state in both groups compared to the start of the study. The increase in body weight during the HFD feeding was higher in the probiotic group than in the control group, however, there were no significant differences in body fat content. Fasting plasma glucose levels were lower in the group fed the probiotic supplement, whereas insulin and lipids were not different. Caecal levels of short-chain fatty acids were not significantly different between the groups. An oral glucose tolerance test showed that the group fed probiotics had a significantly lower insulin release compared to the control group, although the rate of glucose clearance was not different. Taken together, these data indicate that L. plantarum DSM 15313 has anti-diabetic properties when fed together with an HFD. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Volatile: analysis * Lactobacillus plantarum: physiology * Obesity: prevention & control * Plasma: chemistry * Probiotics: administration & dosage, * Body Weight: physiology * Adipose Tissue: physiology * Cecum: chemistry * Diabetes Mellitus: prevention & control * Diet: methods * Fats: administration & dosage * Fatty Acids
in
Beneficial microbes
volume
1
issue
2
pages
189 - 196
publisher
Wageningen Academic Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000208380800011
  • pmid:21840806
  • scopus:84856403922
ISSN
1876-2891
DOI
10.3920/BM2009.0036
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
66d944a6-778b-45c1-b912-50c10547ecbf (old id 2858255)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21840806?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-07-04 09:58:47
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:50:17
@article{66d944a6-778b-45c1-b912-50c10547ecbf,
  abstract     = {Today, the gut microbiota is considered a key organ in host nutritional metabolism and recent data have suggested that alterations in gut microbiota contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Accordingly, a whole range of beneficial effects relating to inflammation and gut health have been observed following administration of probiotics to both humans and different animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of an oral probiotic supplement, Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313, to high-fat diet (HFD) fed C57BL/6J mice, a model of human obesity and early diabetes. The mice were fed the experimental diets for 20 weeks, after which the HFD had induced an insulin-resistant state in both groups compared to the start of the study. The increase in body weight during the HFD feeding was higher in the probiotic group than in the control group, however, there were no significant differences in body fat content. Fasting plasma glucose levels were lower in the group fed the probiotic supplement, whereas insulin and lipids were not different. Caecal levels of short-chain fatty acids were not significantly different between the groups. An oral glucose tolerance test showed that the group fed probiotics had a significantly lower insulin release compared to the control group, although the rate of glucose clearance was not different. Taken together, these data indicate that L. plantarum DSM 15313 has anti-diabetic properties when fed together with an HFD.},
  author       = {Axling, Ulrika and Bränning, Camilla and Ahrné, Siv and Molin, Göran and Alenfall, J and Önning, Gunilla and Nyman, Margareta and Holm, C},
  issn         = {1876-2891},
  keyword      = {Volatile: analysis * Lactobacillus plantarum: physiology * Obesity: prevention & control * Plasma: chemistry * Probiotics: administration & dosage,* Body Weight: physiology * Adipose Tissue: physiology * Cecum: chemistry * Diabetes Mellitus: prevention & control * Diet: methods * Fats: administration & dosage * Fatty Acids},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {189--196},
  publisher    = {Wageningen Academic Publishers},
  series       = {Beneficial microbes},
  title        = {Probiotics lower plasma glucose in the high-fat fed C57BL/6J mouse.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3920/BM2009.0036},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2010},
}