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Cell replacement therapy in human neurodegenerative disorders

Lindvall, Olle LU and Hagell, Peter LU (2002) In Clinical Neuroscience Research 2(1-2). p.86-92
Abstract
Clinical studies with intrastriatal transplants of embryonic mesencephalic tissue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) provide proof-of-principle for the cell replacement strategy in the diseased human brain. The grafted dopaminergic neurons can reinnervate the denervated striatum, restore regulated dopamine release and movement-related frontal cortical activation, and give rise to significant symptomatic relief. In the most successful cases, patients have been able to withdraw L-DOPA treatment after transplantation and resume an independent life. However, it is unlikely that transplantation of human primary embryonic tissue can be developed into therapies for large numbers of patients. Stem cells could be useful as an unlimited... (More)
Clinical studies with intrastriatal transplants of embryonic mesencephalic tissue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) provide proof-of-principle for the cell replacement strategy in the diseased human brain. The grafted dopaminergic neurons can reinnervate the denervated striatum, restore regulated dopamine release and movement-related frontal cortical activation, and give rise to significant symptomatic relief. In the most successful cases, patients have been able to withdraw L-DOPA treatment after transplantation and resume an independent life. However, it is unlikely that transplantation of human primary embryonic tissue can be developed into therapies for large numbers of patients. Stem cells could be useful as an unlimited source of specific neuron types, e.g. dopamine neurons. So far, neurons with at least some dopaminergic characteristics have been generated from stem cells. However, their survival after grafting in animal models has been poor and it is also unclear if they function as normal dopamine neurons. It is important to emphasize that the biological problems which have to be solved in order to develop stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disorders like PD are complex and should not be underestimated. Progress should therefore be made with great care. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
neural stem cells, Parkinson's disease, neural transplantation, positron emission tomography, dopamine
in
Clinical Neuroscience Research
volume
2
issue
1-2
pages
86 - 92
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000177944800010
  • scopus:0036065839
ISSN
1873-779X
DOI
10.1016/S1566-2772(02)00010-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f99f753a-1f29-4083-8dfe-9d345b33f172 (old id 328611)
date added to LUP
2007-11-23 12:20:59
date last changed
2017-12-17 03:23:38
@article{f99f753a-1f29-4083-8dfe-9d345b33f172,
  abstract     = {Clinical studies with intrastriatal transplants of embryonic mesencephalic tissue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) provide proof-of-principle for the cell replacement strategy in the diseased human brain. The grafted dopaminergic neurons can reinnervate the denervated striatum, restore regulated dopamine release and movement-related frontal cortical activation, and give rise to significant symptomatic relief. In the most successful cases, patients have been able to withdraw L-DOPA treatment after transplantation and resume an independent life. However, it is unlikely that transplantation of human primary embryonic tissue can be developed into therapies for large numbers of patients. Stem cells could be useful as an unlimited source of specific neuron types, e.g. dopamine neurons. So far, neurons with at least some dopaminergic characteristics have been generated from stem cells. However, their survival after grafting in animal models has been poor and it is also unclear if they function as normal dopamine neurons. It is important to emphasize that the biological problems which have to be solved in order to develop stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disorders like PD are complex and should not be underestimated. Progress should therefore be made with great care.},
  author       = {Lindvall, Olle and Hagell, Peter},
  issn         = {1873-779X},
  keyword      = {neural stem cells,Parkinson's disease,neural transplantation,positron emission tomography,dopamine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {86--92},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Neuroscience Research},
  title        = {Cell replacement therapy in human neurodegenerative disorders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1566-2772(02)00010-5},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2002},
}