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Signs of Degeneration in 12-22-Year Old Grafts of Mesencephalic Dopamine Neurons in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

Kurowska, Zuzanna LU ; Englund, Elisabet LU ; Widner, Håkan LU ; Lindvall, Olle LU ; Li, Jia-Yi LU and Brundin, Patrik LU (2011) In Journal of Parkinson's Disease 1(1). p.83-92
Abstract
We demonstrate that grafted human fetal mesencephalic neurons can survive and extend axons for 22 years in the brain of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD). In this patient, the overall survival and fiber outgrowth of the grafts were, however, relatively poor, which is consistent with the lack of significant clinical graft-induced benefit. We have compared the morphology of neurons in the 22-year old grafts with those in two younger grafts (16- and 12-year old), which were sequentially implanted in another PD patient. In the case with the 22-year-old transplant, a high proportion (up to 38%) of the grafted dopaminergic (pigment-granule containing) neurons do not express tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and their perikarya... (More)
We demonstrate that grafted human fetal mesencephalic neurons can survive and extend axons for 22 years in the brain of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD). In this patient, the overall survival and fiber outgrowth of the grafts were, however, relatively poor, which is consistent with the lack of significant clinical graft-induced benefit. We have compared the morphology of neurons in the 22-year old grafts with those in two younger grafts (16- and 12-year old), which were sequentially implanted in another PD patient. In the case with the 22-year-old transplant, a high proportion (up to 38%) of the grafted dopaminergic (pigment-granule containing) neurons do not express tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and their perikarya appear atrophic. The proportion of pigmented neurons not expressing these markers is lower in the 12-16 year old grafts. Furthermore, in the 22-year-old graft, 49% of the pigmented neurons display alpha-synuclein immunoreactivity in the cell body and 1.2% of them contain Lewy bodies. In conclusion, our results show that grafted dopaminergic neurons can survive for more than two decades. However, over time an increasing proportion of grafted neurons exhibit signs of degeneration. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Neural, transplantation, graft survival, dopamine, phenotype, tyrosine, hydroxylase, alpha-synuclein, Lewy bodies
in
Journal of Parkinson's Disease
volume
1
issue
1
pages
83 - 92
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000308481700009
  • scopus:79958227103
ISSN
1877-718X
DOI
10.3233/JPD-2011-11004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f8e807e-cff0-4da1-b8fc-437c0b43c0b9 (old id 3470407)
date added to LUP
2013-03-01 07:44:34
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:23:36
@article{0f8e807e-cff0-4da1-b8fc-437c0b43c0b9,
  abstract     = {We demonstrate that grafted human fetal mesencephalic neurons can survive and extend axons for 22 years in the brain of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD). In this patient, the overall survival and fiber outgrowth of the grafts were, however, relatively poor, which is consistent with the lack of significant clinical graft-induced benefit. We have compared the morphology of neurons in the 22-year old grafts with those in two younger grafts (16- and 12-year old), which were sequentially implanted in another PD patient. In the case with the 22-year-old transplant, a high proportion (up to 38%) of the grafted dopaminergic (pigment-granule containing) neurons do not express tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and their perikarya appear atrophic. The proportion of pigmented neurons not expressing these markers is lower in the 12-16 year old grafts. Furthermore, in the 22-year-old graft, 49% of the pigmented neurons display alpha-synuclein immunoreactivity in the cell body and 1.2% of them contain Lewy bodies. In conclusion, our results show that grafted dopaminergic neurons can survive for more than two decades. However, over time an increasing proportion of grafted neurons exhibit signs of degeneration.},
  author       = {Kurowska, Zuzanna and Englund, Elisabet and Widner, Håkan and Lindvall, Olle and Li, Jia-Yi and Brundin, Patrik},
  issn         = {1877-718X},
  keyword      = {Neural,transplantation,graft survival,dopamine,phenotype,tyrosine,hydroxylase,alpha-synuclein,Lewy bodies},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {83--92},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Parkinson's Disease},
  title        = {Signs of Degeneration in 12-22-Year Old Grafts of Mesencephalic Dopamine Neurons in Patients with Parkinson's Disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JPD-2011-11004},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2011},
}