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Diet quality and change in blood lipids during 16 years of follow-up and their interaction with genetic risk for dyslipidemia

Sonestedt, Emily LU ; Hellstrand, Sophie LU ; Drake, Isabel LU ; Schulz, Christina Alexandra LU ; Ericson, Ulrika LU ; Hlebowicz, Joanna LU ; Persson, Margaretha M. LU ; Gullberg, Bo LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU and Engström, Gunnar LU , et al. (2016) In Nutrients 8(5).
Abstract

A high diet quality according to the Swedish nutrition recommendations is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. To further clarify this protective association, we examined the association between high diet quality and change in triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) after 16 years of follow-up in 3152 individuals (61% women; 46–68 years at baseline). In addition, we examined if genetic risk scores composed of 80 lipid-associated genetic variants modify these associations. A diet quality index based on intakes of saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, sucrose, fiber, fruit and vegetables, and fish... (More)

A high diet quality according to the Swedish nutrition recommendations is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. To further clarify this protective association, we examined the association between high diet quality and change in triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) after 16 years of follow-up in 3152 individuals (61% women; 46–68 years at baseline). In addition, we examined if genetic risk scores composed of 80 lipid-associated genetic variants modify these associations. A diet quality index based on intakes of saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, sucrose, fiber, fruit and vegetables, and fish was constructed. A high diet quality was associated with lower risk of developing high triglycerides (p = 0.02) and high LDL-C (p = 0.03) during follow-up compared with a low diet quality. We found an association between diet quality and long-term change in HDL-C only among those with lower genetic risk for low HDL-C as opposed to those with higher genetic risk (p-interaction = 0.04). Among those with lower genetic risk for low HDL-C, low diet quality was associated with decreased HDL-C during follow-up (p = 0.05). In conclusion, individuals with high adherence to the Swedish nutrition recommendation had lower risk of developing high triglycerides and LDL-C during 16 years of follow-up.

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published
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Diet, Epidemiology, Genetics, Lipids, Lipoproteins, Nutrition
in
Nutrients
volume
8
issue
5
publisher
MDPI Ag
external identifiers
  • scopus:84966397439
  • wos:000378780900035
ISSN
2072-6643
DOI
10.3390/nu8050274
language
English
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yes
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42da2ff6-de44-4ece-8e21-ad1137a56629
date added to LUP
2016-06-30 08:30:59
date last changed
2017-03-19 04:34:15
@article{42da2ff6-de44-4ece-8e21-ad1137a56629,
  abstract     = {<p>A high diet quality according to the Swedish nutrition recommendations is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. To further clarify this protective association, we examined the association between high diet quality and change in triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) after 16 years of follow-up in 3152 individuals (61% women; 46–68 years at baseline). In addition, we examined if genetic risk scores composed of 80 lipid-associated genetic variants modify these associations. A diet quality index based on intakes of saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, sucrose, fiber, fruit and vegetables, and fish was constructed. A high diet quality was associated with lower risk of developing high triglycerides (p = 0.02) and high LDL-C (p = 0.03) during follow-up compared with a low diet quality. We found an association between diet quality and long-term change in HDL-C only among those with lower genetic risk for low HDL-C as opposed to those with higher genetic risk (p-interaction = 0.04). Among those with lower genetic risk for low HDL-C, low diet quality was associated with decreased HDL-C during follow-up (p = 0.05). In conclusion, individuals with high adherence to the Swedish nutrition recommendation had lower risk of developing high triglycerides and LDL-C during 16 years of follow-up.</p>},
  articleno    = {274},
  author       = {Sonestedt, Emily and Hellstrand, Sophie and Drake, Isabel and Schulz, Christina Alexandra and Ericson, Ulrika and Hlebowicz, Joanna and Persson, Margaretha M. and Gullberg, Bo and Hedblad, Bo and Engström, Gunnar and Orho-Melander, Marju},
  issn         = {2072-6643},
  keyword      = {Diet,Epidemiology,Genetics,Lipids,Lipoproteins,Nutrition},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  publisher    = {MDPI Ag},
  series       = {Nutrients},
  title        = {Diet quality and change in blood lipids during 16 years of follow-up and their interaction with genetic risk for dyslipidemia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu8050274},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2016},
}