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Self-Knowledge/Self-Regulation/Self-Control: A Ubiquitous Computing Perspective

Hall, Lars LU (2003) In Lund University Cognitive Studies 113.
Abstract
This thesis is about self-knowledge, self-regulation and self-control. All three of these terms are easily understandable, and apply to situations in our daily lives (like misjudging one’s own competence at retiling the bathroom floor, or feeling the anxiety and thrill of doing unsupervised work, or guiltily hitting the snooze-button for the fifth time, and missing half a day of school). The five papers collected in the thesis are arranged in a rough progression from theoretical to applied. All papers are co-authored with Petter Johansson, and for paper five, also with David de Léon. The first paper analyzes some lingering influences that introspectionist accounts of self-knowledge hold over cognitive science and psychological research.... (More)
This thesis is about self-knowledge, self-regulation and self-control. All three of these terms are easily understandable, and apply to situations in our daily lives (like misjudging one’s own competence at retiling the bathroom floor, or feeling the anxiety and thrill of doing unsupervised work, or guiltily hitting the snooze-button for the fifth time, and missing half a day of school). The five papers collected in the thesis are arranged in a rough progression from theoretical to applied. All papers are co-authored with Petter Johansson, and for paper five, also with David de Léon. The first paper analyzes some lingering influences that introspectionist accounts of self-knowledge hold over cognitive science and psychological research. The paper identifies outstanding questions that have been neglected by the introspectionist paradigm of self-knowledge, and sketches a profile for a future research program to redress the imbalance. The paper that follows discusses a particular aspect of self-knowledge: knowledge of mental strategies, things that we believe ourselves to be doing in our minds. It is argued that in order to come to grips with this undeniably important, but highly troublesome category of mental activity, additional sources of evidence besides introspective judgment is needed. The paper explores the role brain imaging technology might play in this process. The third paper discusses the relationship between the concept of neurofeedback and research on metacognition, and analyzes the potential role of neurofeedback both as a research tool and as a practical metacognitive aid. The fourth paper has a more applied focus. It provides an overview of a variety of processes of self-regulation in the educational domain, and identifies ways in which these processes could be supported by sensor and computing technology. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibilities inherent in wireless sensing of human affective states. The topic of the fifth and final paper of the thesis is the perennial problem of self-control. A basic model of the domain of self-control is provided and a range of suggestions for how modern sensor and computing technology might be of use in scaffolding and augmenting our self-control abilities is presented. The proposed solutions are founded on the possibilities of precommitment, and explication of self-knowledge, afforded by these new technologies. (Less)
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author
supervisor
opponent
  • prof Alwood, Carl-Martin, Lunds universitet
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
pervasive computing, affective computing, persuasive computing, Psychology, Psykologi, ubiquitous computing, computer-mediated extrospection, precommitment, distributed motivation, distributed cognition, neurofeedback, biofeedback, metacognition, brain-imaging, learning strategies, emotion regulation, mental strategies, verbal report, implicit learning, consciousness, introspection, self-control, Self-knowledge, self-regulation
in
Lund University Cognitive Studies
volume
113
pages
292 pages
publisher
Lund University Cognitive Science, Kungshuset Lundagård, 222 22 Lund,
defense location
Room 104, Kungshuset, Lundagård, Lund
defense date
2003-12-05 10:15:00
external identifiers
  • other:ISRN: LUHFDA/HFKO-1014-SE
ISSN
1101-8453
ISBN
ISBN 91-974741-2-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The publication histories for the papers included in the thesis are as follows: Paper One: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). Introspection and Extrospection: Some Notes on the Contextual Nature of Self-Knowledge. Lund University Cognitive Studies, 107. Parts of this paper are based on material from: Hall, L. (1998). The Enemy From Within: Of Memes, Modules, Explanation and Confabulation.Connexions: Current Research in Cognitive Science, 4. Online Journal. Available at: http:// www.shef.ac.uk/~phil/connex/issue04.html Hall, L., Johansson, P., Olsson, A. (2002). On the irrelevance of ‘process purity problems’ in natural environments. Poster presented at Towards a Science of Consciousness, Tucson, April 8–12, 2002. Hall, L., Johansson, P., Olsson, A (2001). Why so little has been said about Telling More Than We Can Know: On verbal report and mental processes. Poster presented at the First International Conference on Social Cognitive Neuroscience, University of California, Los Angeles, April 26–28. Paper Two: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). On the Role of Brain-Imaging in the Calibration of Mental Strategies. Lund University Cognitive Studies, 108. An earlier version of this paper has been published as: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). On the Role of Brain-Imaging Technologies in the Calibration of Learning Strategies. In. V. Devedzic, J. Spector, D. Sampson and Kinshuk (Eds.). Proceedings of the The 3rd IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT’03) . 396–397. Paper Three: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). Neurofeedback and Metacognition. Lund University Cognitive Studies, 110. An earlier version of this paper has been published as: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). Neurofeedback and Metacognition. In. R. Azevedo (Ed.). AIED 2003 Supplementary Proceedings: Metacognition and Self-regulation in Learning with Metacognitive Tools. 541–556. Paper Four: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). Self-Regulation in Education: A Ubiquitous Computing Perspective.Lund University Cognitive Studies, 111. An earlier version of this paper has been published as: Hall, L., & Johansson, P. (2003). Self-Regulation in Education: A Ubiquitous Computing Perspective. In. Proceedings of the Eleventh International PEG Conference (PEG 2003): Powerful ICT-tools for Teaching and Learning. (CD-Rom). Paper Five: Hall, L., de Léon, D., & Johansson, P. (2002). The Future of Self- Control: Distributed Motivation and Computer-Mediated Extrospection. Lund University Cognitive Studies, 95. This paper has also been submitted to ACM Transactions on Computer–Human Interaction(TOCHI), for a special issue on socialissues and human–computer interaction.
id
6dbb6a0a-4f4c-45f0-b27a-6868b264880f (old id 466332)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:07:37
date last changed
2019-05-21 20:42:50
@phdthesis{6dbb6a0a-4f4c-45f0-b27a-6868b264880f,
  abstract     = {This thesis is about self-knowledge, self-regulation and self-control. All three of these terms are easily understandable, and apply to situations in our daily lives (like misjudging one’s own competence at retiling the bathroom floor, or feeling the anxiety and thrill of doing unsupervised work, or guiltily hitting the snooze-button for the fifth time, and missing half a day of school). The five papers collected in the thesis are arranged in a rough progression from theoretical to applied. All papers are co-authored with Petter Johansson, and for paper five, also with David de Léon. The first paper analyzes some lingering influences that introspectionist accounts of self-knowledge hold over cognitive science and psychological research. The paper identifies outstanding questions that have been neglected by the introspectionist paradigm of self-knowledge, and sketches a profile for a future research program to redress the imbalance. The paper that follows discusses a particular aspect of self-knowledge: knowledge of mental strategies, things that we believe ourselves to be doing in our minds. It is argued that in order to come to grips with this undeniably important, but highly troublesome category of mental activity, additional sources of evidence besides introspective judgment is needed. The paper explores the role brain imaging technology might play in this process. The third paper discusses the relationship between the concept of neurofeedback and research on metacognition, and analyzes the potential role of neurofeedback both as a research tool and as a practical metacognitive aid. The fourth paper has a more applied focus. It provides an overview of a variety of processes of self-regulation in the educational domain, and identifies ways in which these processes could be supported by sensor and computing technology. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibilities inherent in wireless sensing of human affective states. The topic of the fifth and final paper of the thesis is the perennial problem of self-control. A basic model of the domain of self-control is provided and a range of suggestions for how modern sensor and computing technology might be of use in scaffolding and augmenting our self-control abilities is presented. The proposed solutions are founded on the possibilities of precommitment, and explication of self-knowledge, afforded by these new technologies.},
  author       = {Hall, Lars},
  isbn         = {ISBN 91-974741-2-6},
  issn         = {1101-8453},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Lund University Cognitive Science, Kungshuset Lundagård, 222 22 Lund,},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund University Cognitive Studies},
  title        = {Self-Knowledge/Self-Regulation/Self-Control: A Ubiquitous Computing Perspective},
  volume       = {113},
  year         = {2003},
}