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Aberrant nigral diffusion in Parkinson's disease : A longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study

Loane, Clare; Politis, Marios; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Valle-Guzman, Natalie; Paul, Gesine LU ; Widner, Håkan LU ; Foltynie, Thomas; Barker, Roger A LU and Piccini, Paola (2016) In Movement Disorders 31(7). p.6-1020
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Measuring microstructure alterations with diffusion tensor imaging in PD is potentially a valuable tool to use as a biomarker for early diagnosis and to track disease progression. Previous studies have reported a specific decrease of nigral fractional anisotropy in PD. However, to date the effect of disease progression on nigral or striatal diffusion indices has not been fully explored.

METHODS: We have conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study in 18 early stage, treated PD patients and 14 age-matched controls. PD patients were scanned on 2 occasions OFF medication, 19.3 months apart (standard deviation = 3.1 months). Longitudinal change of regional nigral and striatal measures of... (More)

BACKGROUND: Measuring microstructure alterations with diffusion tensor imaging in PD is potentially a valuable tool to use as a biomarker for early diagnosis and to track disease progression. Previous studies have reported a specific decrease of nigral fractional anisotropy in PD. However, to date the effect of disease progression on nigral or striatal diffusion indices has not been fully explored.

METHODS: We have conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study in 18 early stage, treated PD patients and 14 age-matched controls. PD patients were scanned on 2 occasions OFF medication, 19.3 months apart (standard deviation = 3.1 months). Longitudinal change of regional nigral and striatal measures of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were calculated using a region-of-interest approach.

RESULTS: Region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that at baseline, PD patients and controls did not differ in regard to diffusion indices in any region assessed. A significant difference of nigral fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity between controls and PD patients at follow-up was detected and confirmed with longitudinal analysis within PD patients. Alterations in striatal regions were not detected in either group or over time.

CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that nigral diffusion measure may be a valuable measure of disease progression. In the future, larger longitudinal studies will confirm whether diffusion indices may serve as sensitive and clinically meaningful measures of disease progression in PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Journal Article
in
Movement Disorders
volume
31
issue
7
pages
6 - 1020
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84977500207
  • wos:000379942900017
ISSN
0885-3185
DOI
10.1002/mds.26606
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
54730d05-0ab9-4521-8948-3a76eb349154
date added to LUP
2016-11-23 13:08:36
date last changed
2017-11-05 05:09:50
@article{54730d05-0ab9-4521-8948-3a76eb349154,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Measuring microstructure alterations with diffusion tensor imaging in PD is potentially a valuable tool to use as a biomarker for early diagnosis and to track disease progression. Previous studies have reported a specific decrease of nigral fractional anisotropy in PD. However, to date the effect of disease progression on nigral or striatal diffusion indices has not been fully explored.</p><p>METHODS: We have conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study in 18 early stage, treated PD patients and 14 age-matched controls. PD patients were scanned on 2 occasions OFF medication, 19.3 months apart (standard deviation = 3.1 months). Longitudinal change of regional nigral and striatal measures of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were calculated using a region-of-interest approach.</p><p>RESULTS: Region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that at baseline, PD patients and controls did not differ in regard to diffusion indices in any region assessed. A significant difference of nigral fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity between controls and PD patients at follow-up was detected and confirmed with longitudinal analysis within PD patients. Alterations in striatal regions were not detected in either group or over time.</p><p>CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that nigral diffusion measure may be a valuable measure of disease progression. In the future, larger longitudinal studies will confirm whether diffusion indices may serve as sensitive and clinically meaningful measures of disease progression in PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.</p>},
  author       = {Loane, Clare and Politis, Marios and Kefalopoulou, Zinovia and Valle-Guzman, Natalie and Paul, Gesine and Widner, Håkan and Foltynie, Thomas and Barker, Roger A and Piccini, Paola},
  issn         = {0885-3185},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {6--1020},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Movement Disorders},
  title        = {Aberrant nigral diffusion in Parkinson's disease : A longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.26606},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2016},
}