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Kidney function and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among elderly people : a cross-sectional study on potential hazards for an at risk population

Modig, Sara LU and Elmståhl, Sölve LU (2018) In International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy p.1-8
Abstract

Background Renal elimination normally decreases with age. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) carry a risk of additional kidney damage. Objective The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of NSAIDs in the elderly (aged ≥ 65) population in Sweden, explore reasons for any possible differences in the level of use and assess their kidney functions. Setting Data were obtained from the cohort study Good Aging in Skåne, Sweden. Patients aged 65 or more were included. Methods Medication lists were collected as well as variables such as cognition and education levels. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated from creatinine and cystatin C. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used. Main outcome... (More)

Background Renal elimination normally decreases with age. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) carry a risk of additional kidney damage. Objective The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of NSAIDs in the elderly (aged ≥ 65) population in Sweden, explore reasons for any possible differences in the level of use and assess their kidney functions. Setting Data were obtained from the cohort study Good Aging in Skåne, Sweden. Patients aged 65 or more were included. Methods Medication lists were collected as well as variables such as cognition and education levels. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated from creatinine and cystatin C. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used. Main outcome measure: NSAID use among the general elderly population. Results A total of 1798 patients were included. Approximately six percent (n = 105) of the people in the study group were using NSAIDs and of those 82 (78%) bought NSAIDs over the counter (OTC). 42% of those buying NSAIDs OTC showed an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Education level did not affect the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nor did age. NSAIDs were more commonly used than other recommended analgesics. Conclusion Many people are unaware of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs. The findings imply that the frailest elderly use NSAIDs to the same extent as the younger elderly do. It is important that information about safety of these drugs be communicated to both patients and healthcare professionals.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
Anti-inflammatory agents, Elderly, Glomerular filtration rate, NSAID, Risk, Sweden
in
International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
pages
1 - 8
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042194270
ISSN
2210-7703
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
55636d91-bbff-4e6b-a6d1-0ce5ee600090
date added to LUP
2018-03-12 10:11:48
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:20:15
@article{55636d91-bbff-4e6b-a6d1-0ce5ee600090,
  abstract     = {<p>Background Renal elimination normally decreases with age. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) carry a risk of additional kidney damage. Objective The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of NSAIDs in the elderly (aged ≥ 65) population in Sweden, explore reasons for any possible differences in the level of use and assess their kidney functions. Setting Data were obtained from the cohort study Good Aging in Skåne, Sweden. Patients aged 65 or more were included. Methods Medication lists were collected as well as variables such as cognition and education levels. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated from creatinine and cystatin C. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used. Main outcome measure: NSAID use among the general elderly population. Results A total of 1798 patients were included. Approximately six percent (n = 105) of the people in the study group were using NSAIDs and of those 82 (78%) bought NSAIDs over the counter (OTC). 42% of those buying NSAIDs OTC showed an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min/1.73 m<sup>2</sup>. Education level did not affect the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nor did age. NSAIDs were more commonly used than other recommended analgesics. Conclusion Many people are unaware of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs. The findings imply that the frailest elderly use NSAIDs to the same extent as the younger elderly do. It is important that information about safety of these drugs be communicated to both patients and healthcare professionals.</p>},
  author       = {Modig, Sara and Elmståhl, Sölve},
  issn         = {2210-7703},
  keyword      = {Anti-inflammatory agents,Elderly,Glomerular filtration rate,NSAID,Risk,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {1--8},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy},
  title        = {Kidney function and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among elderly people : a cross-sectional study on potential hazards for an at risk population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  year         = {2018},
}