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Functional connectivity changes in core resting state networks are associated with cognitive performance in systemic lupus erythematosus

Nystedt, Jessika LU ; Mannfolk, Peter LU ; Jönsen, Andreas LU ; Nilsson, Petra LU ; Strandberg, Tor O. LU and Sundgren, Pia C. LU (2019) In Journal of Comparative Neurology 527(11). p.1837-1856
Abstract

To investigate core resting state networks in SLE patients with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms by examining functional connectivity changes correlating with results of cognitive testing. Structural MRI and resting state-fMRI (rs-fMRI) were performed in 61 female SLE patients (mean age: 36.8 years, range 18.2–52.0 years) and 20 healthy controls (HC) (mean age 36.2 years, range 23.3–52.2 years) in conjunction with clinical examination and cognitive testing. Alterations in core resting state networks, not found in our healthy controls sample, correlated with cognitive performance gauged by neuropsychological tests in non-neuropsychiatric SLE (nNP) as well as in neuropsychiatric SLE patients (NP). The observed pattern of increased... (More)

To investigate core resting state networks in SLE patients with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms by examining functional connectivity changes correlating with results of cognitive testing. Structural MRI and resting state-fMRI (rs-fMRI) were performed in 61 female SLE patients (mean age: 36.8 years, range 18.2–52.0 years) and 20 healthy controls (HC) (mean age 36.2 years, range 23.3–52.2 years) in conjunction with clinical examination and cognitive testing. Alterations in core resting state networks, not found in our healthy controls sample, correlated with cognitive performance gauged by neuropsychological tests in non-neuropsychiatric SLE (nNP) as well as in neuropsychiatric SLE patients (NP). The observed pattern of increased functional connectivity in core resting state networks correlated with reduced cognitive performance on all cognitive domains tested and with a heavy focus on DM, CE, and DM–CE in the NP subgroup. Furthermore, we found that the observed alterations in memory and psychomotor speed correlated with disease duration. In SLE patients both with and without clinically overt neuropsychiatric manifestations, we found changes in the functional connectivity of core resting state networks essential to cognitive functions. These findings may represent a rewiring of functional architecture in response to neuronal damage and could indicate suboptimal compensatory mechanisms at play.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
brain connectivity, cognitive dysfunction, functional connectivity, MRI, neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, resting state functional MRI, RRID:SCR_001476, RRID:SCR_004757, RRID:SCR_005283, RRID:SCR_005927, SLE, systemic lupus erythematosus
in
Journal of Comparative Neurology
volume
527
issue
11
pages
1837 - 1856
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85061916940
  • pmid:30707449
ISSN
0021-9967
DOI
10.1002/cne.24656
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
58a3cc47-4980-4be1-ad35-8e40bec7a302
date added to LUP
2019-03-04 09:10:12
date last changed
2019-12-03 03:00:39
@article{58a3cc47-4980-4be1-ad35-8e40bec7a302,
  abstract     = {<p>To investigate core resting state networks in SLE patients with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms by examining functional connectivity changes correlating with results of cognitive testing. Structural MRI and resting state-fMRI (rs-fMRI) were performed in 61 female SLE patients (mean age: 36.8 years, range 18.2–52.0 years) and 20 healthy controls (HC) (mean age 36.2 years, range 23.3–52.2 years) in conjunction with clinical examination and cognitive testing. Alterations in core resting state networks, not found in our healthy controls sample, correlated with cognitive performance gauged by neuropsychological tests in non-neuropsychiatric SLE (nNP) as well as in neuropsychiatric SLE patients (NP). The observed pattern of increased functional connectivity in core resting state networks correlated with reduced cognitive performance on all cognitive domains tested and with a heavy focus on DM, CE, and DM–CE in the NP subgroup. Furthermore, we found that the observed alterations in memory and psychomotor speed correlated with disease duration. In SLE patients both with and without clinically overt neuropsychiatric manifestations, we found changes in the functional connectivity of core resting state networks essential to cognitive functions. These findings may represent a rewiring of functional architecture in response to neuronal damage and could indicate suboptimal compensatory mechanisms at play.</p>},
  author       = {Nystedt, Jessika and Mannfolk, Peter and Jönsen, Andreas and Nilsson, Petra and Strandberg, Tor O. and Sundgren, Pia C.},
  issn         = {0021-9967},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1837--1856},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Comparative Neurology},
  title        = {Functional connectivity changes in core resting state networks are associated with cognitive performance in systemic lupus erythematosus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.24656},
  doi          = {10.1002/cne.24656},
  volume       = {527},
  year         = {2019},
}