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Short-term associations between air pollution concentrations and respiratory health—Comparing primary health care visits, hospital admissions, and emergency department visits in a multi-municipality study

Taj, Tahir LU ; Malmqvist, Ebba LU ; Stroh, Emilie LU ; Åström, Daniel Oudin LU ; Jakobsson, Kristina LU and Oudin, Anna LU (2017) In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14(6).
Abstract

Acute effects of air pollution on respiratory health have traditionally been investigated with data on inpatient admissions, emergency room visits, and mortality. In this study, we aim to describe the total acute effects of air pollution on health care use for respiratory symptoms (ICD10-J00-J99). This will be done by investigating primary health care (PHC) visits, inpatient admissions, and emergency room visits together in five municipalities in southern Sweden, using a case-crossover design. Between 2005 and 2010, there were 81,019 visits to primary health care, 38,217 emergency room visits, and 25,271 inpatient admissions for respiratory symptoms in the study area. There was a 1.85% increase (95% CI: 0.52 to 3.20) in the number of... (More)

Acute effects of air pollution on respiratory health have traditionally been investigated with data on inpatient admissions, emergency room visits, and mortality. In this study, we aim to describe the total acute effects of air pollution on health care use for respiratory symptoms (ICD10-J00-J99). This will be done by investigating primary health care (PHC) visits, inpatient admissions, and emergency room visits together in five municipalities in southern Sweden, using a case-crossover design. Between 2005 and 2010, there were 81,019 visits to primary health care, 38,217 emergency room visits, and 25,271 inpatient admissions for respiratory symptoms in the study area. There was a 1.85% increase (95% CI: 0.52 to 3.20) in the number of primary health care visits associated with a 10 μg/m3 increase in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels in Malmö, but not in the other municipalities. Air pollution levels were generally not associated with emergency room visits or inpatient admissions, with one exception (in Helsingborg there was a 2.52% increase in emergency room visits for respiratory symptoms associated with a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10). In conclusion, the results give weak support for short-term effects of air pollution on health care use associated with respiratory health symptoms in the study area.

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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Air pollution, Case crossover, Hospital admissions and ER visits, Primary health care, Respiratory health
in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
volume
14
issue
6
publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020436086
  • wos:000404107600035
ISSN
1661-7827
DOI
10.3390/ijerph14060587
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
598e2dff-a708-49bb-9cd4-e4596f292923
date added to LUP
2017-07-28 12:42:58
date last changed
2018-05-13 04:34:03
@article{598e2dff-a708-49bb-9cd4-e4596f292923,
  abstract     = {<p>Acute effects of air pollution on respiratory health have traditionally been investigated with data on inpatient admissions, emergency room visits, and mortality. In this study, we aim to describe the total acute effects of air pollution on health care use for respiratory symptoms (ICD10-J00-J99). This will be done by investigating primary health care (PHC) visits, inpatient admissions, and emergency room visits together in five municipalities in southern Sweden, using a case-crossover design. Between 2005 and 2010, there were 81,019 visits to primary health care, 38,217 emergency room visits, and 25,271 inpatient admissions for respiratory symptoms in the study area. There was a 1.85% increase (95% CI: 0.52 to 3.20) in the number of primary health care visits associated with a 10 μg/m<sup>3</sup> increase in nitrogen dioxide (NO<sub>2</sub>) levels in Malmö, but not in the other municipalities. Air pollution levels were generally not associated with emergency room visits or inpatient admissions, with one exception (in Helsingborg there was a 2.52% increase in emergency room visits for respiratory symptoms associated with a 10 μg/m<sup>3</sup> increase in PM<sub>10</sub>). In conclusion, the results give weak support for short-term effects of air pollution on health care use associated with respiratory health symptoms in the study area.</p>},
  articleno    = {587},
  author       = {Taj, Tahir and Malmqvist, Ebba and Stroh, Emilie and Åström, Daniel Oudin and Jakobsson, Kristina and Oudin, Anna},
  issn         = {1661-7827},
  keyword      = {Air pollution,Case crossover,Hospital admissions and ER visits,Primary health care,Respiratory health},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  publisher    = {Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)},
  series       = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health},
  title        = {Short-term associations between air pollution concentrations and respiratory health—Comparing primary health care visits, hospital admissions, and emergency department visits in a multi-municipality study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14060587},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2017},
}