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Anterior and Posterior ERP Rhyming Effects in 3- to 5-year-old Children

Andersson, Annika LU ; Sanders, Lisa D; Coch, Donna; Karns, Christina M. and Neville, Helen (2018) In Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 30. p.178-190
Abstract (Swedish)
During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for
reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related
potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming
paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets
over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over frontolateral
sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with
a smaller... (More)
During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for
reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related
potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming
paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets
over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over frontolateral
sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with
a smaller anterior effect. To determine whether these neural signatures of rhyming related to phonological awareness,
we divided the children into two groups based on phonological awareness scores while controlling for age and
socioeconomic status. The posterior rhyming effect was stronger and more widely distributed in the group with better
phonological awareness, whereas differences between groups for the anterior effect were small and not significant.
This pattern of results suggests that the rhyme processes indexed by the anterior effect are developmental precursors
to those indexed by the posterior effect. Overall, these findings demonstrate early establishment of distributed
neurocognitive networks for rhyme processing. (Less)
Abstract
During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over fronto-lateral sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with a smaller anterior effect. To determine... (More)
During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over fronto-lateral sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with a smaller anterior effect. To determine whether these neural signatures of rhyming related to phonological awareness, we divided the children into two groups based on phonological awareness scores while controlling for age and socioeconomic status. The posterior rhyming effect was stronger and more widely distributed in the group with better phonological awareness, whereas differences between groups for the anterior effect were small and not significant. This pattern of results suggests that the rhyme processes indexed by the anterior effect are developmental precursors to those indexed by the posterior effect. Overall, these findings demonstrate early establishment of distributed neurocognitive networks for rhyme processing. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
volume
30
pages
13 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044004380
ISSN
1878-9293
DOI
10.1016/j.dcn.2018.02.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75c239fb-cd9f-4063-a62e-e2d79791faf4
date added to LUP
2018-03-01 11:56:44
date last changed
2018-06-28 03:00:32
@article{75c239fb-cd9f-4063-a62e-e2d79791faf4,
  abstract     = {During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over fronto-lateral sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with a smaller anterior effect. To determine whether these neural signatures of rhyming related to phonological awareness, we divided the children into two groups based on phonological awareness scores while controlling for age and socioeconomic status. The posterior rhyming effect was stronger and more widely distributed in the group with better phonological awareness, whereas differences between groups for the anterior effect were small and not significant. This pattern of results suggests that the rhyme processes indexed by the anterior effect are developmental precursors to those indexed by the posterior effect. Overall, these findings demonstrate early establishment of distributed neurocognitive networks for rhyme processing.},
  author       = {Andersson, Annika and Sanders, Lisa D and Coch, Donna and Karns, Christina M. and Neville, Helen},
  issn         = {1878-9293},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {178--190},
  series       = {Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
  title        = {Anterior and Posterior ERP Rhyming Effects in 3- to 5-year-old Children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2018.02.011},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2018},
}