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Attitudes to Stem Cell Therapy among Ischemic Stroke Survivors in the Lund Stroke Recovery Study

Aked, Joseph; Delavaran, Hossein LU ; Lindvall, Olle LU ; Norrving, Bo LU ; Kokaia, Zaal LU and Lindgren, Arne LU (2017) In Stem Cells and Development 26(8). p.566-572
Abstract

Preclinical studies suggest that stem cell therapy (SCT) may improve poststroke recovery, and clinical trials investigating safety are ongoing. However, knowledge about patients' attitudes to SCT in stroke is limited. We evaluated the knowledge and attitudes to this therapeutic approach as well as possible factors influencing this among stroke patients potentially suitable for SCT. Consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients aged 20-75 years with NIH stroke scale scores 1-18 were included. Exclusion criteria were severe comorbidities or infratentorial stroke. Clinical follow-up after 3-5 years assessed severity of residual stroke symptoms, cognitive function, functional status, patient-reported outcome, and comorbidity, and... (More)

Preclinical studies suggest that stem cell therapy (SCT) may improve poststroke recovery, and clinical trials investigating safety are ongoing. However, knowledge about patients' attitudes to SCT in stroke is limited. We evaluated the knowledge and attitudes to this therapeutic approach as well as possible factors influencing this among stroke patients potentially suitable for SCT. Consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients aged 20-75 years with NIH stroke scale scores 1-18 were included. Exclusion criteria were severe comorbidities or infratentorial stroke. Clinical follow-up after 3-5 years assessed severity of residual stroke symptoms, cognitive function, functional status, patient-reported outcome, and comorbidity, and after receiving standardized information, the participants also completed an eight-item questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes about SCT. The relationships between clinical variables and positive attitude to SCT were assessed with logistic regression analyses. Of 108 patients included at baseline, 84 participated at follow-up and completed the questionnaire. In total, 12% had prior knowledge of SCT. When informed, 63% were positive toward it and 36% reported willingness to participate in SCT trials. Only 5%-8% expressed ethical considerations regarding different stem cell sources. Positive attitudes to SCT were associated with male gender (OR: 3.74; 95% CI: 1.45-9.61; P < 0.01) and better patient-reported outcome (OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00-1.04; P < 0.05). In conclusion, stroke patients had limited prior knowledge of SCT, yet attitudes were positive among the majority after receiving standardized and neutral information. Gender and degree of stroke recovery may influence attitudes to SCT, indicating a need for targeted information to improve knowledge about SCT.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
patient attitude, stem cell therapy, Stroke
in
Stem Cells and Development
volume
26
issue
8
pages
7 pages
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017296519
  • wos:000398446500003
ISSN
1547-3287
DOI
10.1089/scd.2016.0343
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7a098c8c-64e4-4d14-9a47-353648bbe2e1
date added to LUP
2017-05-04 16:45:38
date last changed
2017-09-18 13:34:08
@article{7a098c8c-64e4-4d14-9a47-353648bbe2e1,
  abstract     = {<p>Preclinical studies suggest that stem cell therapy (SCT) may improve poststroke recovery, and clinical trials investigating safety are ongoing. However, knowledge about patients' attitudes to SCT in stroke is limited. We evaluated the knowledge and attitudes to this therapeutic approach as well as possible factors influencing this among stroke patients potentially suitable for SCT. Consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients aged 20-75 years with NIH stroke scale scores 1-18 were included. Exclusion criteria were severe comorbidities or infratentorial stroke. Clinical follow-up after 3-5 years assessed severity of residual stroke symptoms, cognitive function, functional status, patient-reported outcome, and comorbidity, and after receiving standardized information, the participants also completed an eight-item questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes about SCT. The relationships between clinical variables and positive attitude to SCT were assessed with logistic regression analyses. Of 108 patients included at baseline, 84 participated at follow-up and completed the questionnaire. In total, 12% had prior knowledge of SCT. When informed, 63% were positive toward it and 36% reported willingness to participate in SCT trials. Only 5%-8% expressed ethical considerations regarding different stem cell sources. Positive attitudes to SCT were associated with male gender (OR: 3.74; 95% CI: 1.45-9.61; P &lt; 0.01) and better patient-reported outcome (OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00-1.04; P &lt; 0.05). In conclusion, stroke patients had limited prior knowledge of SCT, yet attitudes were positive among the majority after receiving standardized and neutral information. Gender and degree of stroke recovery may influence attitudes to SCT, indicating a need for targeted information to improve knowledge about SCT.</p>},
  author       = {Aked, Joseph and Delavaran, Hossein and Lindvall, Olle and Norrving, Bo and Kokaia, Zaal and Lindgren, Arne},
  issn         = {1547-3287},
  keyword      = {patient attitude,stem cell therapy,Stroke},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {566--572},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Stem Cells and Development},
  title        = {Attitudes to Stem Cell Therapy among Ischemic Stroke Survivors in the Lund Stroke Recovery Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/scd.2016.0343},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2017},
}