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Physical activity and risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a prospective cohort study.

Gallo, Valentina; Vanacore, Nicola; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brayne, Carol; Pearce, Neil; Wark, Petra A; Ward, Heather A; Ferrari, Pietro and Jenab, Mazda, et al. (2016) In European Journal of Epidemiology
Abstract
Previous case-control studies have suggested a possible increased risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) with physical activity (PA), but this association has never been studied in prospective cohort studies. We therefore assessed the association between PA and risk of death from ALS in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 472,100 individuals were included in the analysis, yielding 219 ALS deaths. At recruitment, information on PA was collected thorough standardised questionnaires. Total PA was expressed by the Cambridge Physical Activity Index (CPAI) and analysed in relation to ALS mortality, using Cox hazard models. Interactions with age, sex, and anthropometric measures were assessed. Total... (More)
Previous case-control studies have suggested a possible increased risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) with physical activity (PA), but this association has never been studied in prospective cohort studies. We therefore assessed the association between PA and risk of death from ALS in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 472,100 individuals were included in the analysis, yielding 219 ALS deaths. At recruitment, information on PA was collected thorough standardised questionnaires. Total PA was expressed by the Cambridge Physical Activity Index (CPAI) and analysed in relation to ALS mortality, using Cox hazard models. Interactions with age, sex, and anthropometric measures were assessed. Total PA was weakly inversely associated with ALS mortality with a borderline statistically significant trend across categories (p = 0.042), with those physically active being 33 % less likely to die from ALS compared to those inactive: HR = 0.67 (95 % CI 0.42-1.06). Anthropometric measures, sex, and age did not modify the association with CPAI. The present study shows a slightly decreased-not increased like in case-control studies-risk of dying from ALS in those with high levels of total PA at enrolment. This association does not appear confounded by age, gender, anthropometry, smoking, and education. Ours was the first prospective cohort study on ALS and physical activity. (Less)
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European Journal of Epidemiology
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Springer
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  • pmid:26968841
  • scopus:84960399820
  • wos:000373642000005
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1573-7284
DOI
10.1007/s10654-016-0119-9
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English
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608ddf7f-4ccd-4fa7-8c72-a49800d66604 (old id 8852598)
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2016-03-16 11:49:13
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@article{608ddf7f-4ccd-4fa7-8c72-a49800d66604,
  abstract     = {Previous case-control studies have suggested a possible increased risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) with physical activity (PA), but this association has never been studied in prospective cohort studies. We therefore assessed the association between PA and risk of death from ALS in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 472,100 individuals were included in the analysis, yielding 219 ALS deaths. At recruitment, information on PA was collected thorough standardised questionnaires. Total PA was expressed by the Cambridge Physical Activity Index (CPAI) and analysed in relation to ALS mortality, using Cox hazard models. Interactions with age, sex, and anthropometric measures were assessed. Total PA was weakly inversely associated with ALS mortality with a borderline statistically significant trend across categories (p = 0.042), with those physically active being 33 % less likely to die from ALS compared to those inactive: HR = 0.67 (95 % CI 0.42-1.06). Anthropometric measures, sex, and age did not modify the association with CPAI. The present study shows a slightly decreased-not increased like in case-control studies-risk of dying from ALS in those with high levels of total PA at enrolment. This association does not appear confounded by age, gender, anthropometry, smoking, and education. Ours was the first prospective cohort study on ALS and physical activity.},
  author       = {Gallo, Valentina and Vanacore, Nicola and Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas and Vermeulen, Roel and Brayne, Carol and Pearce, Neil and Wark, Petra A and Ward, Heather A and Ferrari, Pietro and Jenab, Mazda and Andersen, Peter M and Wennberg, Patrik and Wareham, Nicholas and Katzke, Verena and Kaaks, Rudolf and Weiderpass, Elisabete and Peeters, Petra H and Mattiello, Amalia and Pala, Valeria and Barricante, Aurelio and Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores and Travier, Noémie and Travis, Ruth C and Sanchez, Maria-Jose and Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène and Petersson, Jesper and Tjønneland, Anne and Tumino, Rosario and Quiros, Jose Ramon and Trichopoulou, Antonia and Kyrozis, Andreas and Oikonomidou, Despoina and Masala, Giovanna and Sacerdote, Carlotta and Arriola, Larraitz and Boeing, Heiner and Vigl, Matthaeus and Claver-Chapelon, Francoise and Middleton, Lefkos and Riboli, Elio and Vineis, Paolo},
  issn         = {1573-7284},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Physical activity and risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a prospective cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-016-0119-9},
  year         = {2016},
}