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Passage comprehension performance in children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids : the effects of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise in relation to executive function

Brännström, K. Jonas LU ; von Lochow, Heike LU ; Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka LU and Sahlén, Birgitta LU (2019) In Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
Abstract

Purpose: Speech signal degradation such as a voice disorder presented in quiet or in combination with multi-talker babble noise could affect listening comprehension in children with hearing impairment. This study aims to investigate the effects of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on passage comprehension in children with using cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs). It also aims to examine what role executive functioning has for passage comprehension in listening conditions with degraded signals (voice quality and multi-talker babble noise) in children using CI/HA. Methods: Twenty-three children (10 boys and 13 girls; mean age 9 years) using CI and/or HA were tested for passage comprehension in four listening... (More)

Purpose: Speech signal degradation such as a voice disorder presented in quiet or in combination with multi-talker babble noise could affect listening comprehension in children with hearing impairment. This study aims to investigate the effects of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on passage comprehension in children with using cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs). It also aims to examine what role executive functioning has for passage comprehension in listening conditions with degraded signals (voice quality and multi-talker babble noise) in children using CI/HA. Methods: Twenty-three children (10 boys and 13 girls; mean age 9 years) using CI and/or HA were tested for passage comprehension in four listening conditions: a typical voice or a (hoarse) dysphonic, voice presented in quiet or in multi-talker babble noise. Results: The results show that the dysphonic voice did not affect passage comprehension in quiet or in noise. Multi-talker babble noise decreased passage comprehension compared to performance in quiet. No interactions with executive function were found. Conclusions: In conclusion, children with CI/HA seem to struggle with comprehension in poor sound environments, which in turn may reduce learning opportunities at school.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Children, dysphonic voice, executive function, multi-talker babble noise
in
Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063046054
  • pmid:30879365
ISSN
1401-5439
DOI
10.1080/14015439.2019.1587501
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b534390-d2cd-4699-b3bc-161d2c80dbbb
date added to LUP
2019-03-28 14:04:52
date last changed
2020-01-13 01:35:21
@article{8b534390-d2cd-4699-b3bc-161d2c80dbbb,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: Speech signal degradation such as a voice disorder presented in quiet or in combination with multi-talker babble noise could affect listening comprehension in children with hearing impairment. This study aims to investigate the effects of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on passage comprehension in children with using cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs). It also aims to examine what role executive functioning has for passage comprehension in listening conditions with degraded signals (voice quality and multi-talker babble noise) in children using CI/HA. Methods: Twenty-three children (10 boys and 13 girls; mean age 9 years) using CI and/or HA were tested for passage comprehension in four listening conditions: a typical voice or a (hoarse) dysphonic, voice presented in quiet or in multi-talker babble noise. Results: The results show that the dysphonic voice did not affect passage comprehension in quiet or in noise. Multi-talker babble noise decreased passage comprehension compared to performance in quiet. No interactions with executive function were found. Conclusions: In conclusion, children with CI/HA seem to struggle with comprehension in poor sound environments, which in turn may reduce learning opportunities at school.</p>},
  author       = {Brännström, K. Jonas and von Lochow, Heike and Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka and Sahlén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1401-5439},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology},
  title        = {Passage comprehension performance in children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids : the effects of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise in relation to executive function},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015439.2019.1587501},
  doi          = {10.1080/14015439.2019.1587501},
  year         = {2019},
}