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Investments in social capital - implications of social interactions for the production of health

Bolin, Kristian LU ; Lindgren, Björn LU ; Lindström, Martin LU and Nystedt, Paul LU (2003) In Social Science and Medicine 56(12). p.2379-2390
Abstract
This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals... (More)
This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals with lower levels of social capital, ceteris paribus. An empirical model is estimated, using a set of individual panel data from three different time periods in Sweden. We find that social capital is positively related to the level of health capital, which supports the theoretical model. Further, we find that the level of social capital (1) declines with age, (2) is lower for those married or cohabiting, and (3) is lower for men than for women. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
health, human capital, social capital, Sweden, Grossman model, family
in
Social Science and Medicine
volume
56
issue
12
pages
2379 - 2390
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000183084600003
  • pmid:12742602
  • scopus:0038368962
ISSN
1873-5347
DOI
10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00242-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
57f6eb6e-55e1-4728-b296-205025708397 (old id 900359)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 17:56:53
date last changed
2018-02-11 03:34:21
@article{57f6eb6e-55e1-4728-b296-205025708397,
  abstract     = {This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals with lower levels of social capital, ceteris paribus. An empirical model is estimated, using a set of individual panel data from three different time periods in Sweden. We find that social capital is positively related to the level of health capital, which supports the theoretical model. Further, we find that the level of social capital (1) declines with age, (2) is lower for those married or cohabiting, and (3) is lower for men than for women. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Bolin, Kristian and Lindgren, Björn and Lindström, Martin and Nystedt, Paul},
  issn         = {1873-5347},
  keyword      = {health,human capital,social capital,Sweden,Grossman model,family},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2379--2390},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Social Science and Medicine},
  title        = {Investments in social capital - implications of social interactions for the production of health},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00242-3},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2003},
}