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Quinolinic acid-induced inflammation in the striatum does not impair the survival of neural allografts in the rat

Duan, W M LU ; Widner, H LU ; Cameron, Reynolds M and Brundin, P LU (1998) In European Journal of Neuroscience 10(8). p.606-2595
Abstract

It has been suggested that inflammation related to intracerebral transplantation surgery can affect the survival of intrastriatal neural allografts. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted dissociated embryonic mesencephalic tissue from one of two rat strains, Lewis (allogeneic grafts) or Sprague-Dawley (syngeneic grafts), to the striatum of Sprague-Dawley rats. The target striatum was either intact or had received a local injection of quinolinic acid 9 days earlier, in order to induce a marked inflammation. At 6 or 12 weeks after transplantation, there was no significant difference between the different groups regarding the number of surviving grafted tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. However, the graft volume of both the... (More)

It has been suggested that inflammation related to intracerebral transplantation surgery can affect the survival of intrastriatal neural allografts. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted dissociated embryonic mesencephalic tissue from one of two rat strains, Lewis (allogeneic grafts) or Sprague-Dawley (syngeneic grafts), to the striatum of Sprague-Dawley rats. The target striatum was either intact or had received a local injection of quinolinic acid 9 days earlier, in order to induce a marked inflammation. At 6 or 12 weeks after transplantation, there was no significant difference between the different groups regarding the number of surviving grafted tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. However, the graft volume of both the syngeneic and allogeneic implants was significantly larger in the quinolinate-lesioned than in the intact striatum. There were dramatically increased levels of expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens, marked infiltrates of macrophages, activated microglia and astrocytes, and accumulation of large numbers of CD4 and CD8 positive T-lymphocytes in the quinolinate-lesioned striatum. In contrast, these immunological markers were much less abundant around both syngeneic and allogeneic grafts placed in intact striatum. We conclude that severe inflammation caused by quinolinic acid does not lead to rejection of intrastriatal neural allografts.

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keywords
Animals, Astrocytes, Corpus Striatum, Embryo, Mammalian, Female, Graft Survival, Immunohistochemistry, Inflammation, Macrophages, Microglia, Neurons, Quinolinic Acid, Rats, Rats, Inbred Lew, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, T-Lymphocytes, Time Factors, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
European Journal of Neuroscience
volume
10
issue
8
pages
12 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:0031927150
ISSN
0953-816X
DOI
10.1046/j.1460-9568.1998.00279.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a2d81750-9f29-4aac-870b-839f41b06344
date added to LUP
2017-04-19 18:25:33
date last changed
2017-04-28 11:24:33
@article{a2d81750-9f29-4aac-870b-839f41b06344,
  abstract     = {<p>It has been suggested that inflammation related to intracerebral transplantation surgery can affect the survival of intrastriatal neural allografts. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted dissociated embryonic mesencephalic tissue from one of two rat strains, Lewis (allogeneic grafts) or Sprague-Dawley (syngeneic grafts), to the striatum of Sprague-Dawley rats. The target striatum was either intact or had received a local injection of quinolinic acid 9 days earlier, in order to induce a marked inflammation. At 6 or 12 weeks after transplantation, there was no significant difference between the different groups regarding the number of surviving grafted tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. However, the graft volume of both the syngeneic and allogeneic implants was significantly larger in the quinolinate-lesioned than in the intact striatum. There were dramatically increased levels of expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens, marked infiltrates of macrophages, activated microglia and astrocytes, and accumulation of large numbers of CD4 and CD8 positive T-lymphocytes in the quinolinate-lesioned striatum. In contrast, these immunological markers were much less abundant around both syngeneic and allogeneic grafts placed in intact striatum. We conclude that severe inflammation caused by quinolinic acid does not lead to rejection of intrastriatal neural allografts.</p>},
  author       = {Duan, W M and Widner, H and Cameron, Reynolds M and Brundin, P},
  issn         = {0953-816X},
  keyword      = {Animals,Astrocytes,Corpus Striatum,Embryo, Mammalian,Female,Graft Survival,Immunohistochemistry,Inflammation,Macrophages,Microglia,Neurons,Quinolinic Acid,Rats,Rats, Inbred Lew,Rats, Sprague-Dawley,T-Lymphocytes,Time Factors,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {606--2595},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {European Journal of Neuroscience},
  title        = {Quinolinic acid-induced inflammation in the striatum does not impair the survival of neural allografts in the rat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1460-9568.1998.00279.x},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {1998},
}