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Valuing a Lifestyle Intervention for Middle Eastern Immigrants at Risk of Diabetes

Saha, Sanjib LU ; Gerdtham, Ulf LU orcid ; Siddiqui, Faiza LU and Bennet, Louise LU orcid (2018) In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15(3).
Abstract
Willingness-to-pay (WTP) techniques are increasingly being used in the healthcare sector for assessing the value of interventions. The objective of this study was to estimate WTP and its predictors in a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention exclusively targeting Middle Eastern immigrants living in Malmö, Sweden, who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes. We used the contingent valuation method to evaluate WTP. The questionnaire was designed following the payment-scale approach, and administered at the end of the trial, giving an ex-post perspective. We performed logistic regression and linear regression techniques to identify the factors associated
with zero WTP value and positive WTP values. The intervention group... (More)
Willingness-to-pay (WTP) techniques are increasingly being used in the healthcare sector for assessing the value of interventions. The objective of this study was to estimate WTP and its predictors in a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention exclusively targeting Middle Eastern immigrants living in Malmö, Sweden, who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes. We used the contingent valuation method to evaluate WTP. The questionnaire was designed following the payment-scale approach, and administered at the end of the trial, giving an ex-post perspective. We performed logistic regression and linear regression techniques to identify the factors associated
with zero WTP value and positive WTP values. The intervention group had significantly higher average WTP than the control group (216 SEK vs. 127 SEK; p= 0.035; 1 U.S.$ = 8.52 SEK, 2015 price year) per month. The regression models demonstrated that being in the intervention group, acculturation, and self-employment were significant factors associated with positive WTP values. Male participants and lower-educated participants had a significantly higher likelihood of zero WTP. In this era of increased
migration, our findings can help policy makers to take informed decisions to implement lifestyle interventions for immigrant populations. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
willingness-to-pay (WTP), lifestyle intervention, immigrants, type 2 diabetes
in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
volume
15
issue
3
article number
413
pages
13 pages
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042803199
  • pmid:29495529
ISSN
1660-4601
DOI
10.3390/ijerph15030413
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a5ef8de3-7324-4270-b619-096e7782605b
date added to LUP
2018-03-01 15:50:13
date last changed
2021-09-29 01:51:21
@article{a5ef8de3-7324-4270-b619-096e7782605b,
  abstract     = {Willingness-to-pay (WTP) techniques are increasingly being used in the healthcare sector for assessing the value of interventions.  The objective of this study was to estimate WTP and its predictors in a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention exclusively targeting Middle Eastern immigrants living in Malmö, Sweden, who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes.  We used the contingent valuation method to evaluate WTP. The questionnaire was designed following the payment-scale approach, and administered at the end of the trial, giving an ex-post perspective. We performed logistic regression and linear regression techniques to identify the factors associated<br/>with zero WTP value and positive WTP values. The intervention group had significantly higher average WTP than the control group (216 SEK vs. 127 SEK; p= 0.035; 1 U.S.$ = 8.52 SEK, 2015 price year) per month. The regression models demonstrated that being in the intervention group, acculturation, and self-employment were significant factors associated with positive WTP values. Male participants and lower-educated participants had a significantly higher likelihood of zero WTP. In this era of increased<br/>migration, our findings can help policy makers to take informed decisions to implement lifestyle interventions for immigrant populations.},
  author       = {Saha, Sanjib and Gerdtham, Ulf and Siddiqui, Faiza and Bennet, Louise},
  issn         = {1660-4601},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {3},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  series       = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health},
  title        = {Valuing a Lifestyle Intervention for Middle Eastern Immigrants at Risk of Diabetes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030413},
  doi          = {10.3390/ijerph15030413},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2018},
}