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Emotional arousal and lexical specificity modulate response times differently depending on ear of presentation in a dichotic listening task

Blomberg, Frida LU ; Roll, Mikael LU ; Lindgren, Magnus LU ; Brännström, Jonas LU and Horne, Merle LU (2015) In The Mental Lexicon 10(2). p.221-246
Abstract
We investigated possible hemispheric differences in the processing of four different lexical semantic categories: SPECIFIC (e.g. bird), GENERAL (e.g. animal), ABSTRACT (e.g. advice), and EMOTIONAL (e.g. love). These wordtypes were compared using a dichotic listening paradigm and a semantic category classification task. Response times (RTs) were measured when participants classified testwords as concrete or abstract. In line with previous findings, words were expected to be processed faster following right-ear presentation. However, lexical specificity and emotional arousal were predicted to modulate response times differently depending on the ear of presentation. For left-ear presentation, relatively faster RTs were predicted for SPECIFIC... (More)
We investigated possible hemispheric differences in the processing of four different lexical semantic categories: SPECIFIC (e.g. bird), GENERAL (e.g. animal), ABSTRACT (e.g. advice), and EMOTIONAL (e.g. love). These wordtypes were compared using a dichotic listening paradigm and a semantic category classification task. Response times (RTs) were measured when participants classified testwords as concrete or abstract. In line with previous findings, words were expected to be processed faster following right-ear presentation. However, lexical specificity and emotional arousal were predicted to modulate response times differently depending on the ear of presentation. For left-ear presentation, relatively faster RTs were predicted for SPECIFIC and EMOTIONAL words as opposed to GENERAL and ABSTRACT words. An interaction of ear and wordtype was found. For right-ear presentation, RTs increased as testwords’ imageability decreased along the span SPECIFIC–GENERAL–EMOTIONAL–ABSTRACT. In contrast, for left ear presentation, EMOTIONAL words were processed fastest, while SPECIFIC words gave rise to long RTs on par with those for ABSTRACT words. Thus, the prediction for EMOTIONAL words presented in the left ear was borne out, whereas the prediction for SPECIFIC words was not. This might be related to previously found differences in processing of stimuli at a global or local level. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
emotional words, right hemisphere, imageability, semantic representation, concrete words, abstract words, neural correlates of language, dichotic listening, left hemisphere, lexical specificity
in
The Mental Lexicon
volume
10
issue
2
pages
221 - 246
publisher
John Benjamins Publishing Company
external identifiers
  • WOS:000364971300003
  • Scopus:84941347489
ISSN
1871-1340
DOI
10.1075/ml.10.2.03blo
project
Cognition, Communication and Learning
Abstrakta, emotionella och konkreta ord i det mentala lexikonet
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b22084c6-6fa2-4de7-9c0b-41f497a9e5a4 (old id 8051776)
date added to LUP
2015-10-06 16:27:53
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:15:50
@article{b22084c6-6fa2-4de7-9c0b-41f497a9e5a4,
  abstract     = {We investigated possible hemispheric differences in the processing of four different lexical semantic categories: SPECIFIC (e.g. bird), GENERAL (e.g. animal), ABSTRACT (e.g. advice), and EMOTIONAL (e.g. love). These wordtypes were compared using a dichotic listening paradigm and a semantic category classification task. Response times (RTs) were measured when participants classified testwords as concrete or abstract. In line with previous findings, words were expected to be processed faster following right-ear presentation. However, lexical specificity and emotional arousal were predicted to modulate response times differently depending on the ear of presentation. For left-ear presentation, relatively faster RTs were predicted for SPECIFIC and EMOTIONAL words as opposed to GENERAL and ABSTRACT words. An interaction of ear and wordtype was found. For right-ear presentation, RTs increased as testwords’ imageability decreased along the span SPECIFIC–GENERAL–EMOTIONAL–ABSTRACT. In contrast, for left ear presentation, EMOTIONAL words were processed fastest, while SPECIFIC words gave rise to long RTs on par with those for ABSTRACT words. Thus, the prediction for EMOTIONAL words presented in the left ear was borne out, whereas the prediction for SPECIFIC words was not. This might be related to previously found differences in processing of stimuli at a global or local level.},
  author       = {Blomberg, Frida and Roll, Mikael and Lindgren, Magnus and Brännström, Jonas and Horne, Merle},
  issn         = {1871-1340},
  keyword      = {emotional words,right hemisphere,imageability,semantic representation,concrete words,abstract words,neural correlates of language,dichotic listening,left hemisphere,lexical specificity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {221--246},
  publisher    = {John Benjamins Publishing Company},
  series       = {The Mental Lexicon},
  title        = {Emotional arousal and lexical specificity modulate response times differently depending on ear of presentation in a dichotic listening task},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/ml.10.2.03blo},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2015},
}