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Biomanipulating streams : a supplementary tool in lake restoration

Skov, Christian LU ; Hansen, Joan H.; Baktoft, Henrik; Brodersen, Jakob LU ; Brönmark, Christer LU ; Hansson, Lars Anders LU ; Hulthén, Kaj LU ; Chapman, Ben B. LU and Nilsson, P. Anders LU (2019) In Hydrobiologia 829(1). p.205-216
Abstract

Removal of cyprinid fish is a widely used biomanipulation tool to transform turbid shallow eutrophic lakes in north temperate regions into a clear water state. We here evaluate the removal of cyprinids from streams as a supplement to lake fishing. Since cyprinids often aggregate in high densities in lake inlet/outlet streams during winter migration, removal of fish in this space-confined habitat may be cost-efficient as compared to fish removal in the lake habitat. In two consecutive years, we annually removed up to 35% of the dominant cyprinids from an inlet stream to a lake and argue that this could easily be increased with a more targeted fishing effort. Concurrently, we monitored species- and length-specific variation in migration... (More)

Removal of cyprinid fish is a widely used biomanipulation tool to transform turbid shallow eutrophic lakes in north temperate regions into a clear water state. We here evaluate the removal of cyprinids from streams as a supplement to lake fishing. Since cyprinids often aggregate in high densities in lake inlet/outlet streams during winter migration, removal of fish in this space-confined habitat may be cost-efficient as compared to fish removal in the lake habitat. In two consecutive years, we annually removed up to 35% of the dominant cyprinids from an inlet stream to a lake and argue that this could easily be increased with a more targeted fishing effort. Concurrently, we monitored species- and length-specific variation in migration propensity, to explore how this relates to efficient fish removal. Smaller planktivores generally had a much higher migratory propensity than larger benthivores. Hence, stream fishing specifically targets species and size groups that are less efficiently controlled with traditional lake fishing methods. As a rule of thumb, stream fishing is most efficient when water temperature is 2–6°C. Prior to implementing fish removals from streams, the potential evolutionary consequences of the targeted removal of migratory phenotypes should be considered.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cost-effective, Cyprinid fishes, Evolutionary consequences, Fish removal, Migration
in
Hydrobiologia
volume
829
issue
1
pages
205 - 216
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85057100636
ISSN
0018-8158
DOI
10.1007/s10750-018-3832-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4675e6d-d514-4b6a-a083-ae476ee9ed12
date added to LUP
2018-12-05 10:49:30
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:39:03
@article{b4675e6d-d514-4b6a-a083-ae476ee9ed12,
  abstract     = {<p>Removal of cyprinid fish is a widely used biomanipulation tool to transform turbid shallow eutrophic lakes in north temperate regions into a clear water state. We here evaluate the removal of cyprinids from streams as a supplement to lake fishing. Since cyprinids often aggregate in high densities in lake inlet/outlet streams during winter migration, removal of fish in this space-confined habitat may be cost-efficient as compared to fish removal in the lake habitat. In two consecutive years, we annually removed up to 35% of the dominant cyprinids from an inlet stream to a lake and argue that this could easily be increased with a more targeted fishing effort. Concurrently, we monitored species- and length-specific variation in migration propensity, to explore how this relates to efficient fish removal. Smaller planktivores generally had a much higher migratory propensity than larger benthivores. Hence, stream fishing specifically targets species and size groups that are less efficiently controlled with traditional lake fishing methods. As a rule of thumb, stream fishing is most efficient when water temperature is 2–6°C. Prior to implementing fish removals from streams, the potential evolutionary consequences of the targeted removal of migratory phenotypes should be considered.</p>},
  author       = {Skov, Christian and Hansen, Joan H. and Baktoft, Henrik and Brodersen, Jakob and Brönmark, Christer and Hansson, Lars Anders and Hulthén, Kaj and Chapman, Ben B. and Nilsson, P. Anders},
  issn         = {0018-8158},
  keyword      = {Cost-effective,Cyprinid fishes,Evolutionary consequences,Fish removal,Migration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {205--216},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Hydrobiologia},
  title        = {Biomanipulating streams : a supplementary tool in lake restoration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10750-018-3832-4},
  volume       = {829},
  year         = {2019},
}