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Transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients with or without prior stroke

Buchwald, F. LU ; Norrving, B. LU and Petersson, J. LU (2017) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 136(6). p.654-659
Abstract

Objectives: A history of stroke is common in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and ischemic stroke (IS), but there are few reports characterizing this group of patients. We aimed to compare characteristics, risk factors, and secondary preventive treatment in patients with TIA or IS with vs without a history of stroke. Methods: Hospital-based data on TIA and IS events, registered from July 2011 to June 2013, were obtained from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke). Previous stroke was not specified as hemorrhagic or ischemic. Results: A history of stroke was present in 19.3% (2892/15012) of TIA and 24.6% (10853/44169) of IS patients. Patients with prior stroke were older, more often male, and more likely to have atrial... (More)

Objectives: A history of stroke is common in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and ischemic stroke (IS), but there are few reports characterizing this group of patients. We aimed to compare characteristics, risk factors, and secondary preventive treatment in patients with TIA or IS with vs without a history of stroke. Methods: Hospital-based data on TIA and IS events, registered from July 2011 to June 2013, were obtained from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke). Previous stroke was not specified as hemorrhagic or ischemic. Results: A history of stroke was present in 19.3% (2892/15012) of TIA and 24.6% (10853/44169) of IS patients. Patients with prior stroke were older, more often male, and more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF) (TIA: 27.4% vs 16.4%; IS: 36.1% vs 28.0%), hypertension (TIA: 77.5% vs 56.4%; IS: 74.2% vs 59.0%), and diabetes mellitus (TIA: 22.2% vs 14.2%; IS: 26.3% vs 19.5%) compared with those without (all differences P<.0001). At discharge, patients with prior stroke were more often treated with antihypertensive drugs than those without, whereas proportions treated with statins were similar in both groups. Patients with AF and prior stroke were less often treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) medication than those without prior stroke. Conclusions: Both in TIA and IS, vascular risk factors were more common in patients with a history of stroke compared with those without. In contrast to other secondary preventive medications, OAC treatment in the presence of AF was underutilized in patients with a history of stroke.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Atrial fibrillation, Cerebrovascular diseases, History of stroke, Ischemic stroke, Secondary prevention, Transient ischemic attack
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
volume
136
issue
6
pages
654 - 659
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020085345
  • wos:000414488000010
ISSN
0001-6314
DOI
10.1111/ane.12782
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b83fa9f8-180b-4667-9eaa-3c0baa702a5e
date added to LUP
2017-06-16 12:35:54
date last changed
2018-04-22 04:29:47
@article{b83fa9f8-180b-4667-9eaa-3c0baa702a5e,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: A history of stroke is common in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and ischemic stroke (IS), but there are few reports characterizing this group of patients. We aimed to compare characteristics, risk factors, and secondary preventive treatment in patients with TIA or IS with vs without a history of stroke. Methods: Hospital-based data on TIA and IS events, registered from July 2011 to June 2013, were obtained from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke). Previous stroke was not specified as hemorrhagic or ischemic. Results: A history of stroke was present in 19.3% (2892/15012) of TIA and 24.6% (10853/44169) of IS patients. Patients with prior stroke were older, more often male, and more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF) (TIA: 27.4% vs 16.4%; IS: 36.1% vs 28.0%), hypertension (TIA: 77.5% vs 56.4%; IS: 74.2% vs 59.0%), and diabetes mellitus (TIA: 22.2% vs 14.2%; IS: 26.3% vs 19.5%) compared with those without (all differences P&lt;.0001). At discharge, patients with prior stroke were more often treated with antihypertensive drugs than those without, whereas proportions treated with statins were similar in both groups. Patients with AF and prior stroke were less often treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) medication than those without prior stroke. Conclusions: Both in TIA and IS, vascular risk factors were more common in patients with a history of stroke compared with those without. In contrast to other secondary preventive medications, OAC treatment in the presence of AF was underutilized in patients with a history of stroke.</p>},
  author       = {Buchwald, F. and Norrving, B. and Petersson, J.},
  issn         = {0001-6314},
  keyword      = {Atrial fibrillation,Cerebrovascular diseases,History of stroke,Ischemic stroke,Secondary prevention,Transient ischemic attack},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {654--659},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients with or without prior stroke},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12782},
  volume       = {136},
  year         = {2017},
}