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The influence of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on sentence processing and recall performance in school children using cochlear implant and/or hearing aids

Brännström, K. Jonas LU ; von Lochow, Heike LU ; Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka LU and Sahlén, Birgitta LU (2018) In Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
Abstract

Purpose: This study examines the influence of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on processing and storage performance in a working memory task performed by children using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids (HA). Methods: Twenty-three children with a hearing impairment using CI and/or HA participated. Age range was between 6 and 13 years. The Competing Language Processing Task (CLPT) was assessed in three listening conditions; a typical voice presented in quiet, a dysphonic voice in quiet, and a typical voice in multi-talker babble noise (signal-to-noise ratio +10 dB). Being a dual task, the CLPT consists of a sentence processing component and a recall component. The recall component constitutes the measure of working... (More)

Purpose: This study examines the influence of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on processing and storage performance in a working memory task performed by children using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids (HA). Methods: Twenty-three children with a hearing impairment using CI and/or HA participated. Age range was between 6 and 13 years. The Competing Language Processing Task (CLPT) was assessed in three listening conditions; a typical voice presented in quiet, a dysphonic voice in quiet, and a typical voice in multi-talker babble noise (signal-to-noise ratio +10 dB). Being a dual task, the CLPT consists of a sentence processing component and a recall component. The recall component constitutes the measure of working memory capacity (WMC). Higher-level executive function was assessed using Elithorn?s mazes. Results: The results showed that the dysphonic voice did not affect performance in the processing component or performance in the recall component. Multi-talker babble noise decreased performance in the recall component but not in the processing component. Higher-level executive function was not significantly related to performance in any component. Conclusions: The findings indicate that multi-talker babble noise, but not a dysphonic voice quality, seems to put strain on WMC in children using CI and/or HA. AbbreviationsCLPT competing language processing taskISTS international speech test signalSLP speech and language pathologistsWMC working memory capacity.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Children, dysphonic voice multi-talker babble noise, hearing impairment, voice quality, working memory
in
Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85053420580
ISSN
1401-5439
DOI
10.1080/14015439.2018.1504984
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ba1f820c-47a8-498c-bd4f-99830682f7dd
date added to LUP
2018-10-22 10:57:13
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:32:33
@article{ba1f820c-47a8-498c-bd4f-99830682f7dd,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: This study examines the influence of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on processing and storage performance in a working memory task performed by children using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids (HA). Methods: Twenty-three children with a hearing impairment using CI and/or HA participated. Age range was between 6 and 13 years. The Competing Language Processing Task (CLPT) was assessed in three listening conditions; a typical voice presented in quiet, a dysphonic voice in quiet, and a typical voice in multi-talker babble noise (signal-to-noise ratio +10 dB). Being a dual task, the CLPT consists of a sentence processing component and a recall component. The recall component constitutes the measure of working memory capacity (WMC). Higher-level executive function was assessed using Elithorn?s mazes. Results: The results showed that the dysphonic voice did not affect performance in the processing component or performance in the recall component. Multi-talker babble noise decreased performance in the recall component but not in the processing component. Higher-level executive function was not significantly related to performance in any component. Conclusions: The findings indicate that multi-talker babble noise, but not a dysphonic voice quality, seems to put strain on WMC in children using CI and/or HA. AbbreviationsCLPT competing language processing taskISTS international speech test signalSLP speech and language pathologistsWMC working memory capacity.</p>},
  author       = {Brännström, K. Jonas and von Lochow, Heike and Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka and Sahlén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1401-5439},
  keyword      = {Children,dysphonic voice multi-talker babble noise,hearing impairment,voice quality,working memory},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology},
  title        = {The influence of voice quality and multi-talker babble noise on sentence processing and recall performance in school children using cochlear implant and/or hearing aids},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015439.2018.1504984},
  year         = {2018},
}