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Social antecedents and consequences of rhythmic behaviours in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina LU ; Zlakowska, Jagoda ; Klang, Karl Johan ; Bååth, Rasmus LU and Persson, Tomas LU (2019) SweCog p.8-8
Abstract
Recently there has been a growing interest in the rhythmic behaviours (RBs) of nonhuman animals, as a way of tracking the evolutionary origins of musicality. Dominant theories in the field link the emergence of human rhythmic abilities to demands for (1) flexible vocal learning (and thus specific audiomotor neural adaptations) or (2) social bonding and cooperation. Extant evidence from nonhuman species is, however, insufficient to substantiate these theories, and data from our closest genetic relatives - the chimpanzees - is extremely scarce. To address this issue, we tracked the range, contexts and consequences of chimpanzee RBs in an observational study conducted at Furuvik Zoo (Sweden), Kolmården Zoo (Sweden) and MONA Foundation... (More)
Recently there has been a growing interest in the rhythmic behaviours (RBs) of nonhuman animals, as a way of tracking the evolutionary origins of musicality. Dominant theories in the field link the emergence of human rhythmic abilities to demands for (1) flexible vocal learning (and thus specific audiomotor neural adaptations) or (2) social bonding and cooperation. Extant evidence from nonhuman species is, however, insufficient to substantiate these theories, and data from our closest genetic relatives - the chimpanzees - is extremely scarce. To address this issue, we tracked the range, contexts and consequences of chimpanzee RBs in an observational study conducted at Furuvik Zoo (Sweden), Kolmården Zoo (Sweden) and MONA Foundation (Spain). Preliminary results (based on 18 observation hours from Furuvik) showed that RBs are frequent in chimpanzees (N = 239 bouts), and were produced primarily in a social context (89%). The majority of these social bouts had a social consequence (72%, p < 0.001 binomial test), and the social efficacy of RBs produced by females did not differ from that of RBs produced by males (z = 0.9, p > 0.05). RBs appear to accomplish a communicative function in chimpanzees, partially corroborating social theories on the evolutionary origins of human rhythmic abilities. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
pages
8 - 8
conference name
SweCog
conference location
Umeå, Sweden
conference dates
2019-11-07 - 2019-11-08
project
The evolution of musicality: synchronisation behaviours and rhythm perception in chimpanzees
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d678545a-bdf2-4f10-b067-2f3119d52424
alternative location
http://www.swecog.se/files/SweCog_2019.pdf#page=11
date added to LUP
2019-11-14 11:05:35
date last changed
2019-12-19 12:17:24
@misc{d678545a-bdf2-4f10-b067-2f3119d52424,
  abstract     = {Recently there has been a growing interest in the rhythmic behaviours (RBs) of nonhuman animals, as a way of tracking the evolutionary origins of musicality. Dominant theories in the field link the emergence of human rhythmic abilities to demands for (1) flexible vocal learning (and thus specific audiomotor neural adaptations) or (2) social bonding and cooperation. Extant evidence from nonhuman species is, however, insufficient to substantiate these theories, and data from our closest genetic relatives - the chimpanzees - is extremely scarce. To address this issue, we tracked the range, contexts and consequences of chimpanzee RBs in an observational study conducted at Furuvik Zoo (Sweden), Kolmården Zoo (Sweden) and MONA Foundation (Spain). Preliminary results (based on 18 observation hours from Furuvik) showed that RBs are frequent in chimpanzees (N = 239 bouts), and were produced primarily in a social context (89%). The majority of these social bouts had a social consequence (72%, p &lt; 0.001 binomial test), and the social efficacy of RBs produced by females did not differ from that of RBs produced by males (z = 0.9, p &gt; 0.05). RBs appear to accomplish a communicative function in chimpanzees, partially corroborating social theories on the evolutionary origins of human rhythmic abilities.},
  author       = {Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina and Zlakowska, Jagoda and Klang, Karl Johan and Bååth, Rasmus and Persson, Tomas},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {8--8},
  title        = {Social antecedents and consequences of rhythmic behaviours in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)},
  url          = {http://www.swecog.se/files/SweCog_2019.pdf#page=11},
  year         = {2019},
}