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A 3-year follow-up of stroke patients : Relationships between activities of daily living and personality characteristics

Elmståhl, Sölve LU ; Sommer, Marta and Hagberg, Bo LU (1996) In Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics 22(3). p.233-244
Abstract

The importance of some personality characteristics for improvement of activities of daily life (ADL) was studied in sixty-six stroke patients, initially admitted to geriatric rehabilitation (n = 37) or the department of medicine (n = 29), 3 years after stroke. Outcome measurements were activities of daily life and motor and mental functions assessed using the Activity Index (AI) by Hamrin and Wohlin. Neuroticism and extroversion were measured with the Eysenck Personality Inventory Scale. Preferred coping strategies were assessed from interviews on how the patients handle difficult events. Major improvements of ADL and motor functions were seen the first year after stroke. There was no major differences between patients admitted, either... (More)

The importance of some personality characteristics for improvement of activities of daily life (ADL) was studied in sixty-six stroke patients, initially admitted to geriatric rehabilitation (n = 37) or the department of medicine (n = 29), 3 years after stroke. Outcome measurements were activities of daily life and motor and mental functions assessed using the Activity Index (AI) by Hamrin and Wohlin. Neuroticism and extroversion were measured with the Eysenck Personality Inventory Scale. Preferred coping strategies were assessed from interviews on how the patients handle difficult events. Major improvements of ADL and motor functions were seen the first year after stroke. There was no major differences between patients admitted, either to geriatric rehabilitation or traditional medical wards regarding the outcome measurements except for better eating ability in the former group 3 years later. Subjects living alone showed deteriorated ADL functions after 3 years. Extrovert personality and active coping strategy predicted improved ADL functions. Multiple regression analyses with AI as the dependent variable proved active coping to predict functional outcome. In conclusion; increased knowledge about personality characteristics can improve possibilities for a more individual rehabilitation program.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Coping, Disability, Impairment, Quality of life, Rehabilitation, Stroke
in
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
volume
22
issue
3
pages
233 - 244
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:17444438747
ISSN
0167-4943
DOI
10.1016/0167-4943(96)00696-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e715d6cc-85f1-46a7-93d5-134110aca38c
date added to LUP
2019-06-19 11:34:04
date last changed
2020-04-02 02:34:57
@article{e715d6cc-85f1-46a7-93d5-134110aca38c,
  abstract     = {<p>The importance of some personality characteristics for improvement of activities of daily life (ADL) was studied in sixty-six stroke patients, initially admitted to geriatric rehabilitation (n = 37) or the department of medicine (n = 29), 3 years after stroke. Outcome measurements were activities of daily life and motor and mental functions assessed using the Activity Index (AI) by Hamrin and Wohlin. Neuroticism and extroversion were measured with the Eysenck Personality Inventory Scale. Preferred coping strategies were assessed from interviews on how the patients handle difficult events. Major improvements of ADL and motor functions were seen the first year after stroke. There was no major differences between patients admitted, either to geriatric rehabilitation or traditional medical wards regarding the outcome measurements except for better eating ability in the former group 3 years later. Subjects living alone showed deteriorated ADL functions after 3 years. Extrovert personality and active coping strategy predicted improved ADL functions. Multiple regression analyses with AI as the dependent variable proved active coping to predict functional outcome. In conclusion; increased knowledge about personality characteristics can improve possibilities for a more individual rehabilitation program.</p>},
  author       = {Elmståhl, Sölve and Sommer, Marta and Hagberg, Bo},
  issn         = {0167-4943},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {233--244},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics},
  title        = {A 3-year follow-up of stroke patients : Relationships between activities of daily living and personality characteristics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0167-4943(96)00696-6},
  doi          = {10.1016/0167-4943(96)00696-6},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {1996},
}